#681
i'm getting close to the end now, but i had a question about this paragraph:

Settlers Chapter 12

The maquilas do not constitute any economic development for Mexico. They are just labor-intensive intrusions of U.S. manufacturing. It isn't just the profits that go to the U.S. oppressor nation. The U.S. receives both the super-profits and the consumer products themselves, while retaining all the white-collar managerial, professional, clerical, technical and distributive jobs made possible by the production. Even in this form - of giving Mexican women employment at wages five times the usual rate in the rural areas - the imperialist looting has a destructive effect on the social fabric. The border maquilas gather women from all over the unoccupied zone, while helping to force jobless men north across the artificial border.



my economic knowledge is poor but i thought in the most exploited countries the native merchants/companies were bought/driven out by foreign multinationals so the local population had no choice but to accept the lower wages and working conditions. this passage seems to suggest the opposite unless i'm misunderstanding something here or it's an isolated case

#682

Synergy posted:

i'm getting close to the end now, but i had a question about this paragraph:

Settlers Chapter 12

The maquilas do not constitute any economic development for Mexico. They are just labor-intensive intrusions of U.S. manufacturing. It isn't just the profits that go to the U.S. oppressor nation. The U.S. receives both the super-profits and the consumer products themselves, while retaining all the white-collar managerial, professional, clerical, technical and distributive jobs made possible by the production. Even in this form - of giving Mexican women employment at wages five times the usual rate in the rural areas - the imperialist looting has a destructive effect on the social fabric. The border maquilas gather women from all over the unoccupied zone, while helping to force jobless men north across the artificial border.



my economic knowledge is poor but i thought in the most exploited countries the native merchants/companies were bought/driven out by foreign multinationals so the local population had no choice but to accept the lower wages and working conditions. this passage seems to suggest the opposite unless i'm misunderstanding something here or it's an isolated case



I think (but could be wrong--I read that passage a while ago and also have a less developed economic knowledge) in this case and many others where statistics show that the wages working in multinational factories are higher than what people in developing nations would normally get, they are comparing urban manufacturing with rural farming. The expansion of manufacturing in developing countries comes at the expense of small scale farming that would normally make up the economy. So rather than subsisting off local agriculture, the rural population goes off to be wage slaves in dangerous and repressive factories, and then spends the money on imported foods and goods from other multinationals--but the "wage" is technically higher, though the day-to-day lives of the people are arguably worse.

#683
Put another way, 5 * 0 = 0
#684
increased wages in areas developed by imperialism are accompanied by rentiers and company store scumbag tactics recouping the "loss"
#685

rolaids posted:

I think (but could be wrong--I read that passage a while ago and also have a less developed economic knowledge) in this case and many others where statistics show that the wages working in multinational factories are higher than what people in developing nations would normally get, they are comparing urban manufacturing with rural farming. The expansion of manufacturing in developing countries comes at the expense of small scale farming that would normally make up the economy. So rather than subsisting off local agriculture, the rural population goes off to be wage slaves in dangerous and repressive factories, and then spends the money on imported foods and goods from other multinationals--but the "wage" is technically higher, though the day-to-day lives of the people are arguably worse.



does anyone have some in-depth articles about this? i keep finding stuff about low wages and working conditions but not much about widespread effects

#686
[account deactivated]
#687
finally finished the rhizzone's highly endorsed settlers book, late as usual

some minor things to get out of the way:

- a couple of chapters were really long vs others, not sure why he didn't just split them up
- i think it would have helped to explain the "k" spelling style and basic communist ideology to reach a wider audience
- i was excitedly waiting for a chapter on the black panthers that never came
- the last chapter felt a little rushed and unbalanced, i get what he was trying to say but i felt he could have tied the whole thing together a lot better
- there didn't really seem to be much of a solution but maybe that's discussed in his new book?

my thoughts and reactions to real life now:

- this book has forever changed how i view settler society and it's sad to me that 99.9% of people will never read it
- i can't walk into a retail store without feeling uncomfortable now, so much unnecessary garbage everywhere brought into existence through sheer misery
- whenever i turn the radio on and hear DJs chatting about completely trivial things i daydream about all the words that could have been said instead
- my middle class co-workers are preoccupied with sports talk and team clothing and every other mundane discussion with complete disregard for anything else going on in the world
- and i know despite all this, eventually the book will fade from my mind and the full crushing wave of settler propaganda will "settle" me back into my old ways until i'm reminded of it again here or elsewhere

4.5/5 angry settlers

on a positive note, i asked a relative of mine if they would be interested in reading a book about oppression in america and they said "yeah, i guess" so i bought a copy of settlers. they know some of my political views and have read some brief articles i've sent them about imperialism but i'm probably going to include a page with a few quick definitions to some words like "bourgeoisie" or "proletariat". so i was wondering if any of you have suggestions for a quick starter for someone that probably gets all their news from tv or magazines?
#688

Synergy posted:

- this book has forever changed how i view settler society and it's sad to me that 99.9% of people will never read it



yes i had the same experience of being unmoored from my political assumptions. now i see settler-consciousness all over the place, when whites talk about climate change ("better buy land in alaska!", like this great crime could be an opportunity for property speculation). how whites treat their stolen rivers and forests, dam them up, chop em all the fuck down and make subdivisions, these million-year-old things. or how upper-class whites tanked their economy in '07 thru land speculation and blamed it on the oppressed nations, and then had foreclosure cops steal other homes to recapitalize. i was smoking a bowl with a homeless guy and it even came up. he was homeless cuz his wages minus food and rent equaled debt, but his wages minus food equaled a bit of savings. he'd been raided by cops a dozen times but he told me he was saving to buy land. i've thought about what he said and how he intoned 'land', like, he was living the nightmare of the property system, but his consciousness was totally tied up in joining his fellow settlers. and yeah he was white.

if they're young the FIST guide is alright, it's what it says on the tin. it's more than twice as hard to get somebody to read two books though. they'll probably google individual terms or get context clues.

#689
i noticed the new version has the article "Cash & Genocide: The True Story of Japanese-American Reparations"

Spoiler!



i'm having trouble understanding the below passages:

In the Black Hills of South Dakota, a sacred Sioux religious and cultural area that U.S. corporations want to rip up for uranium and other minerals, the U.S. congress has voted the Lakota Nation $1.5 billion as a final settlement. But the struggle goes on, because the Lakota have officially refused the money — they want their land and sovereignty, instead. Did you ever think you’d see the day when white people were trying to force an indigenous nation to take $1.5 billion?

This is why the U.S. ruling class didn’t blink an eyelash at the $3–4 billion that Japanese-American reparations will eventually cost.



what does the U.S. ruling class have to gain from giving Japanese-Americans reparations? the Lakota Nation example makes sense since the empire is trying to take the land and resources but the Japanese-Americans don't have that so what's the drive?

Until 1988, committing genocide wasn’t a felony, not even a misdemeanor, in the U.S. It’s no coincidence that after stalling for 40 years, the U.S. Senate finally completed ratifying the international genocide treaty at the same session that approved Pribilof Aleut and Japanese-American reparations.



he mentions this as a reason i guess but it seems like kind of a stretch that the U.S. Senate would care that much about public perceptions of previous genocides. i feel like there has to be a deeper reason for elite settlers to care

But what the U.S. Empire is doing now is more about preparations than reparations, i.e., preparing their Empire to do New Afrikan genocide



is he talking about the massively increased prison population here or something else? what more damage could be done?

#690

Synergy posted:

on a positive note, i asked a relative of mine if they would be interested in reading a book about oppression in america and they said "yeah, i guess" so i bought a copy of settlers. they know some of my political views and have read some brief articles i've sent them about imperialism but i'm probably going to include a page with a few quick definitions to some words like "bourgeoisie" or "proletariat". so i was wondering if any of you have suggestions for a quick starter for someone that probably gets all their news from tv or magazines?



What is Marxism all About? is published by WWP and is basically a solid 1-3 page explanation of a bunch of different socialist terms. ive found it pretty helpful to quickly explain things for a while.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9297279-what-is-marxism-all-about

e: it was mentioned as the FIST guide above.

Edited by JohnBeige ()

#691
#692
lol
#693
stirling post and nice username to boot
#694
fao reference settlers CREW, Settlers chapter 1 references reupload

https://mega.nz/#!RDRVBAQb!LX5dNNPJd2AHNbxS9VqxwswosV1btiWQaAbsaW4rtvo

<3
#695
Chapter 5 references

done to the best of my abilities, missing a few sources that will probably require book buying,

available here:
https://mega.nz/#!FaYgSaJD!7lkQg_pBCN8hKhIfaUdRGMftqkqQTZq2g8dDuDWdWtI


There are some really interesting things in Sakai's references for this chapter like harold M. Baron's "the demand for black labor" in March-April 1971 "Radical America" magazine

well worth having a flick through these references during your next annual reading of settlers

---

Reference Notes

"14. ibid.; AMADO GUERRERO, Philippine Society and Revolution, Oakland 1979, p. 16-19" should be updated to say "14. ibid.; AMADO GUERRERO, Philippine Society and Revolution, Oakland 1979, p. 16-19 (p.11-13 in this version)"

"19. CARL SCHURZ, "American Imperialism," convocation address at the University of Chicago, January 4 1899 p. 6" should be ammended to say "19. CARL SCHURZ, "American Imperialism," convocation address at the University of Chicago, January 4 1899 p. 6 (should read p. 6-8)"

"21. C. VANN WOODWARD, Tom Watson: Agrarian Rebel, N.Y., 1963 p. 370-380" should be ammeneded to say "21. C. VANN WOODWARD, Tom Watson: Agrarian Rebel, N.Y., 1963 p. 370-380 (believed to be referencing 320-321 & 370-380)"

"27. ibid., p. 85" should be ammended to say "27. ibid., p. 85 (should read p. 82)"

"28. ibid., p. 80-81" should be ammended to say "28. ibid., p. 80-81 (should read p. 74, 80-81)

---

Errors spotted in chapter 5 text

1.
the link on the picture caption: "A chain gang in Fulton County, Georgia in the 1890s. (source)" returns an error for me

2.
"But at the turn of the century the development oftenrailroad systems,"

should read

"But at the turn of the century the development of railroad systems,"

3.
11. HON. JOHN F. SHAFROTH, "The Army Bill and Philippine Policy." Waashington,

should read

11. HON. JOHN F. SHAFROTH, "The Army Bill and Philippine Policy." Washington,

4.
The settler anti-imperialist movement that arose in opposition to these conquests focussed on the Philippines

should read

The settler anti-imperialist movement that arose in opposition to these conquests focused on the Philippines

5.
It was also closely tiedto the reform wing of the Democratic Party,

should read

It was also closely tied to the reform wing of the Democratic Party,

6.
the Populist Party got almost one - third of the vote

should read

the Populist Party got almost one-third of the vote

7.
There 1s no longer, in any meaningful terms, any working class struggle within settler society there.

should read

There is no longer, in any meaningful terms, any working class struggle within settler society there.
#696
chapter 6 is a complete mess, sakai gets references mixed up all over the place, do not worry i will fix this for you
#697
Chapter 7 is labeled as chapter 13 see below:

<html>
<head>
<title>SETTLERS CH 13: KLASS, KULTURE AND KOMMUNITY</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="settlers.css">
</head>
<body>
<div id = "content">
<center>
<h4><< <a href = "ch6.html">VI</a> | <a href = "text-index.html">CONTENTS</a> | <a href="ch8.html">VIII</a> >></h4>
<h1>VII. BREAKTHROUGH OF THE C.I.O.</h1>
#698
breaking tables
#699
update: i have done chapter 6 to the best of my abilities, just waiting for one more book. And a bit of 7 but am probably not goin to do any more for now so 8-10 and the 2nd half of 4 can have a lot added via the internet, while the rest of the 1-6 stuff ive not been able to do will require going to a library or buying some books, probably
#700

tears posted:

chapter 6 is a complete mess, sakai gets references mixed up all over the place, do not worry i will fix this for you


that was purposely to throw off the Feds'. The Art of War, it's in there somewhere.

#701
Kerplesebeb's several Sakai interviews and essays such as The Shock of Recognition are no longer hosted, but are eg. google cached. Perhpas this all could be hosted on the extras page>?
#702
i know they've collected and published a few of those interviews at least because I like to rub my copies on my tummy when I go to bed every night
#703
#704
Read an interview with Sakai about his experiences with white setller society and I feel like a part of "getting" third-worldism is first-hand experience with white settler societies, and a personal disillusionment with the idea of them ever acting against the interests of capital from observing the culture from within.

The people I observed in the Gulf arent settlers, but they are slavers, and anyone willing to work there will find themselves pushed to edge in terms of the sort of workplace tyranny thanks to the total control employers have over you through the visa system and nepotism. They are so ridiculously bourgeois while maintaining their tribal chauvinism, in places like Qatar the locals are a class of their own. I havent been back in the west very long, so ive sorted grafted that experience onto white canadians i meet, whose healthcare, public transportation, subsidized education etc. come from their role as a global exploiter, with federally-backed companies like Kinross retaining 97% of the profits gained from pillaging the rapidly depleteing minerals across the third world using slave labor in mines. Similar in some ways to the oblivious Qataris who thank providence for their oil-check financed air-conditioned SUVs while they sit in traffic trying not to look at the dozens of construction workers building their country for them in 100 degree heat. However I noticed that western society maintains a "work ethic" culture, unlike the spoilt neo-feudalistic culture in the Gulf where expensive gadgets and monthly oversees vacations are not seen as hard work paying off, but a boon from heaven itself in the form of natural gas wealth.

Edited by Caesura109 ()

#705

Caesura109 posted:

However I noticed that western society maintains a "work ethic" culture, unlike the spoilt neo-feudalistic culture in the Gulf where expensive gadgets and monthly oversees vacations are not seen as hard work paying off, but a boon from heaven itself in the form of natural gas wealth.


the narrative around oil wealth in canada sure sounds a lot more like "boon from heaven" (our god-given natural resources!!! Alberta is rich and this is ours!!!) than "hard work paying off"

Edited by drwhat ()

#706
in the United States they just talk about anywhere they've bombed recently like that
#707
Today at work, this old white man I was serving launched into a baffling diatribe, completely unprompted, about how he thought that tribal shellfish rights were bullshit and Indians in the area have no valid claim to the oyster beds because “we put them there”. That was the gist anyway, I didn’t get most of it because 1) he communicated mostly in mumbles and 2) I was actively trying not to listen as I politely raised my eyebrows and said “oh?”, because of how angry he was making me. I imagine this was his pet subject, as old guys tend to have.