#16761
hermetic crew
#16762
how about heretic crew
#16763
tears with the snipe, fuck.
#16764

jansenist_drugstore posted:

how about heretic crew


"that campanella, what a fighter..." - real quote by my high school history teacher (who is also cathleft)

#16765

tears posted:

hermetic crew


finally, my peop- oh. *hangs head and sadly trudges away, dumping "hermit crew" placard*

#16766
hermetic hermit crew band tryouts next tuesday in dytd
#16767
i just started to listen to an audiobook of the three-body problem courtesy of a v kind poster, and i already feel less like driving into a ditch
#16768

ialdabaoth posted:

i just started to listen to an audiobook of the three-body problem courtesy of a v kind poster, and i already feel less like driving into a ditch



It’s interesting if you ignore the Cultural Revolution parts

#16769
i read richard dawkins the god delusion, its so bad, atheists deserve so much better
#16770
Reading capital vol 1. again (every summer I get the urge to, I associate summer with Capital ever since I first read it).

Some ppl on this forum are good at owning, but none of you are as good as Marx, who constantly owned, on every page. Still the most impressive thing I have ever read.
#16771
where could i read marx any time i wanted to online
#16772
hi karphead there is this cool website i found calld http://www.readmarxeveryday.org/
#16773
been feeling Engels lately tho

In the most advanced industrial countries we have subdued the forces of nature and pressed them into the service of mankind; we have thereby infinitely multiplied production, so that a child now produces more than a hundred adults previously did. And what is the result? Increasing overwork and increasing misery of the masses, and every ten years a great collapse. Darwin did not know what a bitter satire he wrote on mankind, and especially on his countrymen, when he showed that free competition, the struggle for existence, which the economists celebrate as the highest historical achievement, is the normal state of the animal kingdom.



http://www.readmarxeveryday.org/dynamics/pt1.html#hmvedec

#16774
https://www.marxists.org/
#16775
wait, what
#16776
This is page 420, which means it's the Marijuana page.
#16777
Puff the magic poster
#16778
i'm reading "the entropy of capitalism" from biel after really liking his eurocentrism book and i gotta say that it's great stuff once again. a more dense read than eurocentrism so far, but a really interesting intersection of ecology, systems theory and marxism, full of really systematic elaborations, some quite creative abstractions into thermodynamics and a solid amount of mao quotes
#16779

#16780

Lysenko posted:


this is the real page 420 shit i signed up for

#16781
*leaning back, maxing with the Central Committee as we discuss future trolls and owns*
#16782

Lysenko posted:


#16783
the essays done... i had to limit my scope bc apparently if they're too long they just get thrown out. i don't think it's effort post material but i WILL make an effort post ab hermeticism in the near future
neat fact: tommasso campanella's name was on the alexander garden obelisk. until 2013 when The Fuckers made it a romanov monument again
#16784
This Pynchon essay about Watts, a black neighborhood in LA. It was written a year after the riots.

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/97/05/18/reviews/pynchon-watts.html


They remember last August's riot as an outburst, a seizure. Yet what, from the realistic viewpoint of Watts, was so abnormal? "Man's got his foot on your neck," said one guy who was there, "sooner or later you going to stop asking him to take it off." The violence it took to get that foot to ease up even the little it did was no surprise. Many had predicted it. Once it got going, its basic objective--to beat the Black and White police--seemed a reasonable one, and was gained the minute The Man had to send troops in. Everybody seems to have known it. There is hardly a person in watts now who finds it painful to talk about, or who regrets that it happened--unless he lost somebody.

But in the white culture outside, in that creepy world full of pre-cardiac Mustang drivers who scream insults at one another only when the windows are up; of large corporations where Niceguymanship is the standing order regardless of whose executive back one may be endeavoring to stab; of an enormous priest caste of shrinks who counsel moderation and compromise as the answer to all forms of hassle; among so much well-behaved unreality, it is next to impossible to understand how Watts may truly feel about violence. In terms of strict reality, violence may be a means to getting money, for example, no more dishonest than collecting exorbitant carrying charges from a customer on relief, as white merchants here still do. Far from a sickness, violence may be an attempt to communicate, or to be who you really are.


#16785

dimashq posted:

ialdabaoth posted:

i just started to listen to an audiobook of the three-body problem courtesy of a v kind poster, and i already feel less like driving into a ditch

It’s interesting if you ignore the Cultural Revolution parts


this is a spoiler for the entire damn trilogy but

Spoiler!

Edited by shriekingviolet ()

#16786

thirdplace posted:

dimashq posted:

ialdabaoth posted:

i just started to listen to an audiobook of the three-body problem courtesy of a v kind poster, and i already feel less like driving into a ditch

It’s interesting if you ignore the Cultural Revolution parts

this is a spoiler for the entire damn trilogy but

Spoiler!



Oh that’s right haha, that became apparent by the end of the first novel and it made me mad lol

#16787
i was hoping the spoiler text would say 'catchphrase'
#16788
#16789
this is violence
#16790
also a couple months back I recommended The Stars Are Legion by K Hurley because it was really good, even if none of you so much as upvoted me for it because you are all swine, ignorant of the pearls I cast upon you. a bit after that I read her newest book, The Light Brigade, and while it's not nearly as wild and unique as Stars Are Legion it's still really good and has passages like this

I remember scavenging on the beach of a sludgy river called the Tajo Luz, me and my cousins. My brother was too young, still slung across my mother’s back. She walked ahead of us, scraping at the beach with a homemade rake, uncovering bits of discarded junk.

Farther up the beach, where the sand turned to scrub, a flash of movement caught my eye. I climbed the shallow dunes. Nestled at the top was a twisted mat of plastic ties, broken twigs, aluminum shavings, and synthetic fibers. A baby pigeon rested there, half in and half out of the nest. One wing lay outstretched, flapping uselessly. I took the poor little creature into my hands.

“It’s all right,” I murmured. I ran my finger over its quivering head. Its heart fluttered against my palm.

I slid down the dune and ran to catch up with my mother. I was barefoot, but the rough ruins of the beach hardly bothered me anymore. My feet were dirty, calloused things, hunks of sturdy meat.

“Mama!” I called. She turned, her dark hair blowing back over her shoulder. The sun rose behind her, thick and runny as fresh egg yolk.

“Mama,” I said, holding up the injured bird. “It’s hurt. Can we help it?”

“Let’s get that home,” she said, and she smoothed the hair from my face. It reminded me of how I had stroked the bird’s tiny head.

I beamed at her.

We took the baby bird home along with six mollusks, some copper wire, and a meter-long metal hunk that bore the faded gray circles of the NorRus logo.

I slept that night next to the baby bird. In the morning, my mother boiled off the bird’s feathers and cooked it whole. I’d like to tell you I had no stomach for it. But if you think for a minute I didn’t want to shove that weary bird down my gullet despite having sung it to sleep the night before, then you have never been hungry.

My mother ate the bird herself, to ensure she made enough milk for my brother. I sat across from her on the floor and watched her consume the entire fledgling in three crunchy bites.

I didn’t cry until she left to greet my father, just home from an expedition to the dumps of medical waste outside the nearby military training academy. Until Teni needed more pilots for the war with Mars, years later, we were nobodies. Ghouls. Just like everyone else there.

I clutched my knees to my chest and cried because I was so hungry. I cried because I wanted the pain to end.

#16791
took a break from Religious Shit to write some notes on 'origin of the family'
#16792
reading the cutting edge of marxist political economy

https://www.workers.org/2019/05/30/why-the-imperialists-hate-huawei/
#16793

red_dread posted:

reading the cutting edge of marxist political economy

https://www.workers.org/2019/05/30/why-the-imperialists-hate-huawei/



I don't even understand why they mention the internal structure of Huawei when they later point out that it is meaningless. Would have been worse of they hadn't and reverted to a Proudhonist understanding of capitalism against "markets" as neutral. Which is de-facto what supporters of China end up advocating when they take neoclassical ideas about market efficiency and gdp growth/poverty reduction figures at their face.

I think the party is lost, the Trotskyist policy of supporting things you hate isn't sustainable but they can't seem to commit to the idea that China is socialist, in this piece they use a bunch of words that don't mean anything to avoid committment like "chemically pure socialism" or "socialism with Chinese characteristics." As long as the party keeps growing it can survive with the mix of Marcyism and internet Marxism-Leninism that currently fights for an internal voice. It won't last forever though. At least it gives them a niche, I don't know if the WWP was involved in the defense of the Venezuelan embassy but social democrats will never do those things no matter how many members they have. On that note I read this reflection of DSA members on supporting Bernie

https://newleftreview.org/issues/II116/articles/dsa-members-america-s-new-left

Some of it is left-liberals slowly relearning the lessons of the past 150 years but so much of it sounds like what the WWP/PSL say that I am skeptical any amount of discussion will make the DSA anything other than an organization for internet radical petty-bourgeois (self-admitted in this piece).

#16794

thirdplace posted:

also a couple months back I recommended The Stars Are Legion by K Hurley because it was really good, even if none of you so much as upvoted me for it because you are all swine, ignorant of the pearls I cast upon you.



i did not like the title but now i am reading it and it's good.

#16795
i have read, Chiang's "Hell Is the Absence of God". It was recommended to me in a conversation about Blish's Black Easter, as the reverse of it. It's okay.

But I suggest again everyone here read Black Easter if they haven't. It's short and good.

The carrot for tHE r H i z z o n E is, in Black Easter, Ronald Reagan gets killed by demons in 1968 as a proof-of-concept demo.
#16796

red_dread posted:

chemically pure socialism



#16797
nice post for page 420 tears
#16798
imperialists hate her: local grandmas exposes one weird trick for chemically pure socialism
#16799
okay I'm finally reading foucault and you guys need to redpill me on why he's bad because to me so far he's really good. here's what i think: i know he spends a lot of time criticizing marxism but i think he himself understands his method of analyzing power as being in some sense "marxist", as well as noting that marx's excavation of capital was maybe a "foucaultian" one that sought to understand it as only one (if dominant) tool or instantiation of power in the perpetuation of class division across history (which i think is something that Marx agrees with Foucault on, that this transhistorical idea of the ruling/ruled class is possible even if the historically specific content of these "classes" changes over time). i find reading him useful for thinking about capital as something contingent that will or at least can cease to exist, i think by focusing on the other forms of these mechanisms that in comparison are much more obviously contingent and historical (i.e. the classic prison-school-hospital triad). he isn't focusing on them in order to tautologically equate them, e.g. "school is prison", to say that they're somehow identical and different in name only, but instead because in their different similarity they point to the greater category of the "exercise of power" to which they all belong, like pottery fragments, and of these mechanisms capital is the obviously the most important both in terms of its greater ubiquity and the size of its impact on the course of the world and i don't think foucault denies this. he's trying to show the way in which these institutions are maybe not purely emanations of capital, epiphenomenal, but parallel instantiations along with it that collectively constitute the historical phenomenon of "power". whether or not this idea of "power" is historically correct i don't think it's a lapse into ultraleftism, i think on the contrary the investigation proceeds along materialist lines and is intended as a materialist critique of certain forms of marxism. what do you guys think

Edited by neckwattle ()

#16800
speaking of chemically pure socialism