#16841

serafiym posted:

pretty crazy how Bret Easton Ellis reflects all the vapid dumbass characters in American Psycho that make the book so entertaining to read.


#16842

serafiym posted:

book so entertaining to read.


Citation needed. Haven't read the book in over a decade, but I remember it being a chore to get through. Not to say the movie wasn't great, but that's mostly because the director Mary Harron was consciously parodying the source material. Watch a movie truer to Ellis's writings like Rules of Attraction and you'll quickly lose track that it's a satire and realize it's a movie about awful rich kids (it's the story of Patrick Bateman's younger brother going through college).

#16843
i stopped reading american psycho at the word "bret"
#16844
idgi is that the first word. i stopped reading after seeing the title
#16845
https://mangarock.com/manga/mrs-serie-100411520
#16846
i stopped reading when i realized it was a book. books are for losers
#16847
i m reading this
#16848
reading a place of greater safety. ngl i am quite enjoying it, although her prose styling is sometimes confusing.
#16849
"Drink more water." - Karl Marx, Das Kapital
#16850
"Clean your room." - Lenin
#16851
"Keep your door open" - leon trotsky
#16852
reading about how putin would fit right in reddit https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/06/russias-president-putin-explains-the-end-of-the-liberal-order.html
#16853

toyotathon posted:

i just got a collection of jack london's old socialist writings... maybe i'll re-post some of the better ones. in high school i was on school newspaper, and me and my buddies we'd take his deep-red polemic, but change some words around to fit whatever bullshit. i remember in one he was going on about how bourgeois blood would flow down gutters and we sanitized it to be about the wet winter weather. after he bought a ranch in california, he told his friends he'd 'lost all interest in the class struggle' but really he'd just switched sides.



reading a couple of his essays (Revolution and Why I Became A Socialist) his vision of socialism was basically social democracy and his idea of socialism was a passionate religion-substitute not a scientific theory for our species to structure mechanical society and large-scale social production), and i believe People Of The Abyss, to compliment his creativity as a writer, spawned this subgenre of political journalist lit, like Down And Out in Paris and London and Nickle and Dimed, where the author does what sakai calls an anthropological expedition into the dirty, overworked class. how it starts anyway, only a quarter thru...

#16854
i read that book "the global perspective" by torkil lauesen, cheers to the forums member who put that on my radar, that was a great read, somewhere between autobiography, political theory and history of imperialism.. its like a more fun to read version of (also great) "dvided world divided class"
#16855

toyotathon posted:

toyotathon posted:


i just got a collection of jack london's old socialist writings... maybe i'll re-post some of the better ones. in high school i was on school newspaper, and me and my buddies we'd take his deep-red polemic, but change some words around to fit whatever bullshit. i remember in one he was going on about how bourgeois blood would flow down gutters and we sanitized it to be about the wet winter weather. after he bought a ranch in california, he told his friends he'd 'lost all interest in the class struggle' but really he'd just switched sides.



reading a couple of his essays (Revolution and Why I Became A Socialist) his vision of socialism was basically social democracy and his idea of socialism was a passionate religion-substitute not a scientific theory for our species to structure mechanical society and large-scale social production), and i believe People Of The Abyss, to compliment his creativity as a writer, spawned this subgenre of political journalist lit, like Down And Out in Paris and London and Nickle and Dimed, where the author does what sakai calls an anthropological expedition into the dirty, overworked class. how it starts anyway, only a quarter thru...


i only really read the sea wolf but he came across to me as one of those 'socialists' who would have become a fascist if he'd lived that long. there's also that story he wrote called 'The Unparalleled Invasion' which is a sort of yellow peril fantasy about the european powers genociding a newly risen china with germ warfare

#16856
from zak cope s latest book:

#16857
i thought this was a joke post and you were just holding up the road to wigan pier
#16858
lol no fucking way in hell i ll read orwell
#16859
Georgie Orgie
#16860
he's a trot, chief
#16861
i have read thousands of chapters of manga this year, and this is probably why ive read so few books
#16862
"divided parks, divided recreation" by zak knope
#16863
went to used book store looking for cadillac desert, could not find. though they had over a dozen copies of some thomas freidmam book about the environment. optimistially determined this is because people dump books they don't want and good ones get snapped up right away

i have always lived in inland areas with bountiful freshwater resources but have made a hobby of learning about the doomed hellscape tribute to hubris that is the southwest. never got around to reading reisner though
#16864

ialdabaoth posted:

though they had over a dozen copies of some thomas freidmam book about the environment. optimistially determined this is because people dump books they don't want and good ones get snapped up right away


I think that's true. There is a very interesting used bookstore where I live and I'd dig through the war nerd section and see good stuff from David Glantz pop up, buy one then come back later and someone else will have grabbed the rest. Meanwhile the books that collect dust in that section are just not particularly interesting, like memoirs from somebody's B-17 grandpa named Buster L. Nixon who wrote as a way of working out his POW trauma after bailing out over Germany: I Must Escape From Camp 29! I'm making that up but it's pretty close.

I think I've told this morbid story before but I rent a place in an older neighborhood and most of my neighbors are very old and very conservative and kicking the bucket at a rapid clip so there are estate sales all the time and I pick through their stuff -- that's how I got this '80s vintage alarm clock for a dollar.

Anyways when looking at their bookshelves, I can usually understand why they hold onto the stuff they do until the end. People keep a lot of practical books, or self-help stuff (and religious books) or books that relate to hobbies; gardening books, cookbooks, and this one guy in his 70s who went down in a plane crash (he was the pilot) mostly had aviation books. If they're into fiction they're into genre stuff, and even though it's mostly blazingly reactionary adventure novels like Tom Clancy for the men. But I read a lot of pulpy sci-fi junk because I am a goony nerd and I can hardly act shocked that 70-year-old white men who own Cessnas in a county Trump won by 20 points like Tom Clancy.

I knew someone who worked in a high-volume used bookstore who thought the most interesting subculture he dealt with were the women who read romance novels since they'd bring in plastic tubs full of these paperbacks, sell them and then take the money and fill the tub back up, then come back a few months later to repeat the cycle all over again. He thought the romance genre was far and away more advanced as a productive process like in terms of how the authors have the formula down and can pump it out on enormous scale.

Edited by trakfactri ()

#16865
https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/china/dialectics.pdf

trying to picture one of amerika's false leaders writing something like On Contradiction, dialectic philosophy used by the many millions to improve crop yields etc. it'd surely be a self-help book, more than half inspirational stories, 20 word title,

Edited by toyotathon ()

#16866
My Journey To Heaven: How America Saved Me (And I Saved For Retirement) by Senator Wesley Clark IV

"I knew from the moment we landed in Mexico City that this wouldn't be just another deployment. As the dust cleared I rubbed my flag pin and remembered my dad's saying: two shakes, any more than that and you're just playing with it. I didn't want to be here any longer than two shakes, anyway! Had to recon with team leader before sunset. Time to move."

(20 years later of diminishing crop yields)

"My farming commune studied Chairman Clark's collected works to prepare for the summer-fall rainless season. We knew we had to shake the peanut bushes twice in order to improve yields, especially with our winter stores empty. Any more than that and we'd just be playing with it..."
#16867
i'm going through transmetropolitan for the first time since i was a teenager, and boy it has not aged well

#16868

trakfactri posted:

romance genre

pump it out on enormous scale




#16869
just got my copy of Turning Money Into Rebellion in the mail; I'm eager to learn how to rob banks in order to fund my lavish settler lifestyle anti-imperialism or whatever
#16870
I'm reading your mind and... you are Gay
#16871
i read lem's solaris this week. it was really incredible. i was reluctant to read it in the first because i thought that the tarkovsky movie was going to affect my reading of the book too strongly, but it didn't at all. i was blown away by his imagery, particularly because it seemed so brief and accidental. it also was much less of a love story than the movie, which made it much better imo. 11/10 highly recommend
#16872
Lem is absolutely incredible, always a joy to read
#16873
i'm reading aime cesaire's discourse on colonialism and it's such a good polemic, there's a great own on almost every page

I have talked a good deal about Hitler. Because he deserves it: he makes it possible to see things on a large scale and to grasp the fact that capitalist society, at its present stage, is incapable of establishing a concept of the rights of all men, just as it has proved incapable of establishing a system of individual ethics. Whether one likes it or not, at the end of the blind alley that is Europe, I mean the Europe of Adenauer, Schuman, Bidault, and a few others, there is Hitler. At the end of capitalism, which is eager to outlive its day, there is Hitler. At the end of formal humanism and philosophic renunciation, there is Hitler.

#16874
started vol 1 of Fernand Braudel's Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century. a good amount of questionable ('savages' etc.) language for something written in 1979. i appreciate how he begins with an overview of the various material statistics and limitations of human civ at the time.

this passage, on the abundance of animal life before industrialisation:

There was an abundance of game in the Rauhe Alb in Wurttemberg in the sixteenth century, but the peasants were forbidden to use large dogs on them; this right was reserved for the foresters. Meanwhile in Persia, not only were there wild boar, stags, bucks, gazelles, lions, tigers, bears and hares, but also prodigious quantities of pigeons, wild geese, ducks, turtledoves, crows, herons and two types of partridge. Naturally, the more deserted the region, the more freely animal life multiplied. Father Verbiest (1682) when he travelled with the Emperor of China's enormous suite (100,000 horses) in Manchuria, was a reluctant and exhausted participant in some fantastic hunts: a thousand stags and sixty tigers were killed in one day. Mauritius was still empty of people in 1639, but turtledoves and hares were so numerous and so unafraid that they were caught by hand. In Florida in 1690 'quantities of wild pigeons, parrots and other birds were so numerous that boats often came away full of birds and birds' eggs'. Of course everything was magnified in the New World: there was a superabundance of uninhabited regions (despoblados) interspersed with a few tiny towns at enormous distances from each other. The twelve large wooden carrioles drawn by thirty pairs of oxen that accompanied the bishop of Santiago de Chile, Lizarraga, in 1600, took about twenty days to travel from Cordoba to Mendoza, in what later became Argentina. Indigenous animals were few, with the exception of ostriches, llamas and seals in the south. Instead, the empty countryside had been filled with animals (horses and cattle) brought from Europe, and these had multiplied. Enormous herds of wild oxen had worn regular paths across the plain; they remained at liberty until the nineteenth century. The silhouettes of the herds of wild horses huddled together sometimes looked like vague hillocks against the horizon. In the pampas where not the tiniest piece of wood could be found, 'not even as large as a little finger', a chapeton, a newcomer to America, caught a glimpse of one such small hillock in the distance and cried out in delight: 'Let's go and cut some wood!'



how radically different the world is today.

#16875
if you like that stuff there's a book called 'paradise found' by steve nicholls which is all about the extent of nature in america at the time of European arrival, goes into lots of detail about animal populations and all that. the only real problem with the book is that he spends the whole thing explicitly tying the decline in natural resources to market mechanisms but then in the conclusion he dismisses the concept of having planned economy in a sentence by pointing out that the soviet union collapsed and just sort of waffles about 'green' capitalism for the rest of it. but the actual bulk of the book is kool
#16876
Braudel is interesting but it valuable to remember that iirc he viewed his approach to history to be consciously anti-marxist. I ended up getting halfway thru the second volume before i got too tired of rolling my eyes at his shit and decided i had better things to do with my time.
#16877
Reading book about Nixon, he was definitely dumber than Trump