#16361

toyotathon posted:

shriekingviolet posted:

I increasingly lean on that goatstein metaphor of Actual Leftism as a point of no return from which you cannot escape once you've actually hit it, because the more people I meet who claim to have once been leftists (the trot-neocon pipeline, hippies who voted for reagan, university activism tourists) the more I build conviction that those people never, ever, ever actually "got it."

for sure it's like- we have parasite classes on us, they're as real as tapeworms. it's significant on a species-level. how could anybody unlearn a thing like that? deer don't have a couple deer claiming to own the forest, demanding tribute, or a permanent class of deer-thieves, it's just our dumb asses. unlearning class consciousness would be like unlearning that rocks are hard.

edit okay for meta-content: i don't really know how to express this. when i started reading political theory seriously, maybe, 5 years ago, coming off a news-addiction, i had an unconscious belief that there was a canon, which we study, absorb, and someday be done with. like a foot race: a long, multi-year marathon, but there was a finish, and that at the finish line, i'd meet with the other runners, and we'd all talk about the race. that was a naivety, how there's a path and a finish, and a qualification to speak. this is how school's set up, so maybe it was a programmed assumption. study is a marathon, but all there is is pace, and the finish line is death. at a book a week, you get maybe 2000 till death -- and who reads a book a week? there's a pace of study, the route's improvised, and there's a continuous conversation, to reproduce what your eyes read, out your mouth to other ears. now i look to where i want to be, intellectually, and i'm just as far from that horizon as when i started, but i'm trying to keep up the pace, cuz there isn't much of an alternative. stoked to talk around people who've been at it longer than me and probably figured this out a while ago, how it's a team sport, and the rules to it.


i think it's just another chosen identity and nothing that good is coming out of it. look, weve seen it. people are boring, crowds are detestable, socialism is a drag. next!

#16362
reading about "uncontacted peoples"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sentinelese

"The Sentinelese, also known as the Sentineli and the North Sentinel Islanders, are an indigenous people who inhabit North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal in India.
...
In early 1974, a National Geographic film crew went to the island with a team of anthropologists to film a documentary, Man in Search of Man. They were accompanied by armed police. When the motorboat broke through the barrier reefs, the locals emerged from the jungle and shot arrows at the boat. They landed at a safe point on the coast and left gifts in the sand, including a miniature plastic car, some coconuts, a live pig, a doll, and aluminum cookware.

The Sentinelese followed up by launching another round of arrows, one of which struck the documentary director in his thigh. The man who wounded the director withdrew to the shade of a tree and laughed proudly while others speared and then buried the pig and the doll. They left afterward, taking the coconuts and cookware."
#16363
i had this short cambodia pdf of a talk by stephen heder called 'khmer rouge opposition to pol pot' sitting around and decided to read it. it's kind of intriguing because it suggests that at least some of the anti pol pot faction within the cpk may have been maoist or pro china in orientation rather than pro vietnamese, but also that their maoism specifically was viewed as traitorous by the pol pot group, which is a bit of a problem for all the academics who like to claim that pol pot was a maoist himself.

#16364
i read nelson mandela's autobiography, now im keen on reading a lot more abt how apartheid went up and came down if i ever find time

nice little bit at the end where during a stopover in the far north of canada after his release he met some inuit teens and was like yeah your circumstances are the same
#16365
Edit: dumb post

Edited by wasted ()

#16366
Better post: http://www.artsrn.ualberta.ca/amcdouga/Hist446_2011/documents_anc_old_site/The%20Rise%20of%20the%20South%20African%20Reich.pdf
#16367
dang I never bought the Ludo Martens “Anotger view of Stalin” book because I didn’t realize Pravda media was run by like 1 dude and he got sick or something so now the site has been down for months. I wanna get that book!
#16368
"anotger view dof stalink", nice racism there, buddy, mods?
#16369
i went to reza negarestanis book release party a few weeks ago n met robin mackay.
i'm also currently reading mark fisher, baudrillaart and a bunch of short stories by jg ballard about space.
#16370
joel, you son-of-a-bitch, nice to meet yah. a favorite tome of mine is re/search's folio on jg ballard. i certainly have enjoyed it more than reading any of his work. hahaha!
#16371

ilmdge posted:

dang I never bought the Ludo Martens “Anotger view of Stalin” book because I didn’t realize Pravda media was run by like 1 dude and he got sick or something so now the site has been down for months. I wanna get that book!


It was actually on sale? Did any copies make it into the wild?

#16372
I think it was on sale for a reasonable amount of time with plenty of copies shipped (and a badass cover) but note that this is Another View of Stalin, not his later book Stalin: A Black Legend, which I do think may not have ever made it out in English. Last I recall some publisher that didn’t previously exist popped up to secure the rights to that one after everyone else refused it.
#16373

ilmdge posted:

I think it was on sale for a reasonable amount of time with plenty of copies shipped (and a badass cover) but note that this is Another View of Stalin, not his later book Stalin: A Black Legend, which I do think may not have ever made it out in English. Last I recall some publisher that didn’t previously exist popped up to secure the rights to that one after everyone else refused it.


i like how they've sort of vaguely made it look like a penguin classic. good job stalin apologia cover designers

#16374
Haha yeah it totally does. I always thought they were a notable publisher, like a division of the currently existing Pravda or something. If I’d known they were gonna close on a moments notice i would have ordered it long ago :smith:

This is their last tweet
#16375
Yeah that's a shame, I would've bought a copy. But thanks for clarifying re:Black Legend, which I'm still holding out hope for
#16376

Synergy posted:

reading about "uncontacted peoples"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sentinelese

"The Sentinelese, also known as the Sentineli and the North Sentinel Islanders, are an indigenous people who inhabit North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal in India.
...
In early 1974, a National Geographic film crew went to the island with a team of anthropologists to film a documentary, Man in Search of Man. They were accompanied by armed police. When the motorboat broke through the barrier reefs, the locals emerged from the jungle and shot arrows at the boat. They landed at a safe point on the coast and left gifts in the sand, including a miniature plastic car, some coconuts, a live pig, a doll, and aluminum cookware.

The Sentinelese followed up by launching another round of arrows, one of which struck the documentary director in his thigh. The man who wounded the director withdrew to the shade of a tree and laughed proudly while others speared and then buried the pig and the doll. They left afterward, taking the coconuts and cookware."


#16377
heading to belgium later this month so hope i can finally pick up dutch/french versions of those martens titles that are nowhere to be found online like the sankara book, ussr and the velvet counter revolution (translated to english but out of print iirc) and his trotsky book
#16378

ilmdge posted:

I think it was on sale for a reasonable amount of time with plenty of copies shipped (and a badass cover) but note that this is Another View of Stalin, not his later book Stalin: A Black Legend, which I do think may not have ever made it out in English. Last I recall some publisher that didn’t previously exist popped up to secure the rights to that one after everyone else refused it.


lol ludo martens and domenico losurdo are very much entirely different people my friends =]

#16379

elias posted:

lol ludo martens and domenico losurdo are very much entirely different people my friends =]


have you ever seen them in the same room together?

#16380
https://magazine.uc.edu/editors_picks/recent_features/unearthingamasterpiece.html
#16381
thats interesting, I took a big interest in minoan statues a few months ago, this was always the one which stood out as being super wierd. its a chryselephantine (god and ivory) figurine found at palaikastro on crete, the "Palaikastro Kouros"; found in 1990, made around 3500 years ago, the level of craftship is absurd and suppasses anything else found before or after, (except that seal swampman posted). Chryselephantine statuettes are a whole mystery in themselves and worth reading about. Anyway, if you get the chance go in the british museum and look at the minoan stuff, the massive decline in craftsmanship after this period is highly obvious when you can see a chronology; there is a great mystery contained in minoan civilisation. Anywwhere heres the Palaikastro Kouros:



but this one was always my favorite, from knossos, "stone cold snake hurling witch w/ cat on head"



your whole history needs to be completly rewritten,
#16382
In 1987 archaeologists excavating the Bronze Age site of Palaikastro in East Crete uncovered the fragmentary remains of a gold and ivory statuette. Further fragments were recovered during excavations in 1988 and 1990, and over 6 tons of earth was carefully sieved to ensure recovery of as many pieces as possible.

The statuette, which originally consisted of separately-carved components of hippopotamus ivory, serpentine, rock crystal, wood, and gold, with added decoration in ‘Egyptian’ blue, has been painstaking reconstructed from several hundred burnt and broken fragments. Standing 50 centimeters tall, it depicts a male youth, with left leg slightly advanced. However, unlike Archaic Greek kouroi, which hold both arms at their sides, the Palaikastro figure has both arms sharply bent at the elbows and holds its clenched fists before its chest. It also once wore a golden kilt, penis sheath, dagger, and sandals, whereas Archaic kouroi are nude.

The carving of this chryselephantine statuette is extraordinarily fine, surpassing other examples of Cretan Bronze Age sculpture in bronze, terracotta, and stone. Minute details of anatomy, such as subcutaneous veins and tendons as well as muscles and cuticles are rendered with veristic exactitude. The dark blue-gray serpentine head, or more precisely scalp, is meticulously incised, as if to represent shaved hair on the sides and a braided topknot above. Although badly damaged and discolored, it is certainly the most remarkable piece of Minoan sculpture that has survived to this day.



This short, attractive booklet by one of the directors of the Palaikastro excavations presents the statuette in clear, readily accessible form with numerous color illustrations. Brief sections introduce the figure and the site in general; recall the discovery and deposition of the finds; speculate on the identification of the findspot as ‘a town shrine’; describe the statuette, its materials, techniques, conservation, and modern museum display in detail, and Minoan ivory work in general; and seek to identify the ‘kouros’ iconographically. (Unfortunately there is no bibliography beyond citation of an edited volume published in 2000.(1))



Intriguingly, different parts of the Palakastro statuette were found in different locations, and in different condition, which the excavators believe to be the result of deliberate destruction during the late 15th century BC. In the ‘Plateia’ facing Building 5, which is tentatively identified as a ‘Town Shrine’ on account of its finely cut sandstone masonry with double-axe incised marks and other accouterments, excavators recovered the ivory torso and left arm, fragments of gold, and patches of blue pigment. Nearby were the right arm, separately carved ivory feet, and the serpentine head. All were burned. Inside the building, some 10 meters distant, were the figure’s two legs, much more badly burnt and broken (one was reconstituted from 190 fragments), and gold sandals. The excavators believe the distance between the two groups of finds too great to be explained by the figure having fallen from an upper storey (if so, why were some components, including the feet, separate from the legs, found outside the building?). Sackett, rather, suggests that ‘a hostile intruder, whether looter or iconoclast, could have seized the figure by the legs and, as he moved outside but stood close to the door looking inside, could have hurled these into the building. As he did this the figure would have broken and the major pieces would have fallen close by…while others would have bounced back into the Plateia’ (p. 8). This, of course, makes for good reading, but is highly speculative. Likewise, in the Conservation section Sackett observes that the legs inside the building suffered from burning at considerably higher temperatures than the ivory components found outside: ‘Indeed a study of the temperatures which normally occur in accidental house fires, as opposed to those of deliberate arson shows that the rooms where our figure was found had been deliberately filled with inflammable material (such as brushwood)’ (pp. 13-14 italics in original). Unfortunately, no reference to this study is provided, but it seems to be a paper given by T. Cunningham in 2002, published in 2007. There the destruction sequence is reconstructed even more vividly.(2)



Returning to the figure itself, of considerable interest are the materials and techniques of the statue, which was composed, mostly of hippopotamus ivory. Sackett states that large lower incisors were employed, but earlier studies suggest that these straight tusks formed the legs, while the extremely fragmentary face, torso, and arms were fashioned from curved upper canines. Thus the statue might have been carved from the dentition of a single animal. Over all, eight ivory components were joined by wooden dowels (apparently olive), and a central wooden element, now lost, must have connected the torso to the legs. The serpentine head was attached to the back of the face, and rock crystal eyes were inserted in-between. Clothing was added in gold sheet. This assembly is made clear by a cut-away drawing and detailed illustrations of the joins as well as of individual components. The anonymous craftsman employed some 47 drilled and chiseled mortises, circular and triangular in section, far more than necessary to join the components and sometimes overlapping, which indicates that many of the joins were made ‘blind’. Moreover, evidence of surviving tool marks, mostly on the tabs that slotted into the figure’s base and other unexposed surfaces, indicate that in addition to chisels and drills saws, gravers, points, burins, rasps, and knives were also used in the production of the figure, which must have been produced by a master carver trained in wood. (For a boxwood replica of the statuette carved by Mark Moak, who contributed some of the reconstruction drawings in this volume, see http://www.rocky.edu/pdf/alumni-friends/rt/Winter09RT.pdf and http://www.rocky.edu/academics/programs/art/GalleryExhibit.shtml).



The closest parallels for the style and technique of the figure are the ivory components recovered by Sir Arthur Evans from the so-called ‘Treasury Deposit’ at Knossos, and by Sinclair Hood in later excavations along the ‘Royal Road’ at the same site, but Sackett rightly notes the ‘astonishing sophistication of our craftsman in representing the human form, its bone structure, muscles, tendons, and veins, and especially details of hands and feet that can stand up to the critique of a modern expert in human anatomy’, and he seems to approve of the suggestion that such detailed carving is based on observation of a live human model, or even that the Minoan artist might have gained anatomical knowledge from dissection, a practice first attested in Hellenistic Alexandria (pp. 20-22). Elsewhere, however, he repeats earlier observations that the figure’s proportions seem to be based on a variation of the First Egyptian canon, making the figure taller and more slender, and that some of the anatomical details, though carefully carved, are not entirely accurate (pp. 23-24).
#16383
the little red book, which is my favorite book
#16384
RIP to William Blum
#16385
hey did you know you can click this link to http://cia.gov ?? just for a laugh
#16386
lol yeah that's why I just did the tweet embed, despite it not being in the quarantine thread. the fact that you can read Killing Hope on the CIA website is hilarious and I wanted to tell people here about it, but i didn't have it in me to actually put down the link
#16387
set up my browser to inject dependencies from cia servers to own them