#17761
PM Press is clearing out some books that sat in an Amazon warehouse then got shipped back, 4/$20 or 20/$100. You can’t pick the books but you can pick the category. Use promo code FREESHIP.

https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=842

I assume everyone is like me and has a big backlog already but hey, picking up a bunch of left wing books for $5 each isn’t a bad deal
#17762

Tönnies - Gemeinschaft und Gesellschaft (trans. Harris and Hollis, Cambridge University Press, 2001) posted:

When abstract reason engages in a technical investigation it is scientific reason, practised by someone who is capable of recognising objective relations, i.e. who thinks in abstract terms. Scientific concepts are judgements about the origin and nature of things, by means of which complicated structures of sense data are given names – which circulate within the world of science in the same way as goods do in society. They come together in the system like goods in the market. The most abstract form of scientific concept which no longer denotes anything in the real world, like for example the concept of the atom or the concept of energy, is similar to money.


Tönnies - Gemeinschaft und Gesellschaft (Quoted in Lukacs - History and Class Consciousness, trans. Livingstone, Merlin Press, 1971) posted:

A special case of abstract reason is scientific reason and its subject is the man who is objective, and who recognises relations, i.e. thinks in concepts. In consequence, scientific concepts which by their ordinary origin and their real properties are judgements by means of which complexes of feelings are given names, behave within science like commodities on the market. The supreme scientific concept which is no longer then name of anything real is like money. E.g. the concept of an atom, or of energy.



lmao :rolleyes:

#17763
can somebuggy help me out, please, i beg you

#17764
die w i s s e n s c h a f t -
#17765

pogfan1996 posted:

Turning Money into Rebellion is a fun read, it’s structured into four parts: background on the blekingegade group, an essay from a couple members on their actions, an interview, then internal documents. Really interesting deep dive into one potential expression of a labor aristocracy analysis


I'm putting this on my list, it sounds rad. Thanks

#17766
One of the guys from Heavy Radicals came out with a new book on the FBI destroying the careers of folk singers called "The Folk Singers and the Bureau: The FBI, the Folk Artists and the Suppression of the Communist Party, USA-1939-1956"

The first book to document the efforts of the FBI against the most famous American folk singers of the mid-twentieth century, including Woody Guthrie, 'Sis Cunningham, Pete Seeger, Lee Hays and Burl Ives.

Some of the most prominent folk singers of the twentieth century, including Woody Guthrie, 'Sis Cunningham, Pete Seeger, Lee Hays, Burl Ives, etc., were also political activists with various associations with the American Communist Party. As a consequence, the FBI, along with other governmental and right-wing organizations, were monitoring them, keeping meticulous files running many thousands of pages, and making (and carrying out) plans to purge them from the cultural realm.

In The Folk Singers and the Bureau, Aaron J Leonard draws on an unprecedented array of declassified documents and never before released files to shed light on the interplay between left-wing folk artists and their relationship with the American Communist Party, and how it put them in the US government's repressive cross hairs.

At a time of increasing state surveillance and repression, The Folk Singers and the Bureau shows how the FBI and other governmental agencies have attempted to shape and repress American culture.



I was listening to a podcast interview, he was originally going to do the book on folk singers of the 60s and 70s, but the FBI wouldn't release their files, but he was able to get his hands on a bunch of FBI files from the 30s, 40s, and 50s which is around the time the FBI was building its concentration camp lists for communists

#17767

shriekingviolet posted:

die w i s s e n s c h a f t -


die, science!

#17768
I'm reading alternate history Web site while pretending to work. A friend sent a thing on this to me after we talked about La Follette in 1924. Everyone who writes this stuff is still the worst historian possible. They have like, long passages where United $naKKKe$ presidents look up at the sky and think about how important it is to give the vote to slaves. Then someone gets dropsy and dies and samurai conquer Washington because a guy wasn't there to win on the third Wheatcake Party convention ballot. CNN horse race history.
#17769
that sounds badass and epic
#17770
oh ok
#17771

pogfan1996 posted:

PM Press is clearing out some books that sat in an Amazon warehouse then got shipped back, 4/$20 or 20/$100. You can’t pick the books but you can pick the category. Use promo code FREESHIP.

https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=842



i ordered the marxism grabbag and got:

Maoism and the Chinese Revolution - Elliot Liu
Living and Dying on the Factory Floor - David Ranney
Pictures of a Gone City - Richard Walker
In, Against, and Beyond Capitalism - John Holloway

started with the Ranney book and it's really good so far, will probably order from the armed struggle grabbag later this week, thx for the heads up

#17772
Ranney's book is interesting for as long as it's about his own activism then turns into generic radleft anti-neoliberalism critique. It's almost a pattern/ritual in these types of books. Talking about giving up labour struggle for more prosperity (fallen out of a tree) but eventually devolving into 'everyone is oppressed now' etc. If stronger labour/rights movements (as opposed to bourgeois redistribution of colonial plunder intended to pacify them along racial lines) led to better living standards within the metropolis, why didn't those things diminish alongside the movements themselves? They line up all the ingredients but refuse to do anything with them!
#17773

vimingok posted:

Ranney's book is interesting for as long as it's about his own activism then turns into generic radleft anti-neoliberalism critique. It's almost a pattern/ritual in these types of books. Talking about giving up labour struggle for more prosperity (fallen out of a tree) but eventually devolving into 'everyone is oppressed now' etc. If stronger labour/rights movements (as opposed to bourgeois redistribution of colonial plunder intended to pacify them along racial lines) led to better living standards within the metropolis, why didn't those things diminish alongside the movements themselves? They line up all the ingredients but refuse to do anything with them!



thanks for the spoiler alert a-hole!!!

#17774
actually, i kind of predicted that from his preface. my thoughts right now are about the type of jobs he was involved in and how most of them have been outsourced outside of amerika.
#17775

pogfan1996 posted:

Greetings Comrades!
We are excited to announce that Foreign Languages Press is co-sponsoring an online book launch with BAYAN, and the University of the Philippines-Center for International Studies (UPCIS) of two books by Pao-yu Ching:

From Victory to Defeat: China’s Socialist Road and Capitalist Reversal

And

Rethinking Socialism: What Is Socialist Transition?

The books will be reviews by José Maria Sison, founder of the Communist Party of the Philippines and J. Moufawad-Paul, writer, philosopher and author of From Victory to Defeat’s introduction.

The book launch will feature a message from the author, who will be available during an open forum to answer questions.

FLP will be giving a short message, as well as Carol Araullo, Chairperson of Bayan.

Philippines: Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 9AM
North America (West Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 5PM
North America (East Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 8PM
* please note the time correction

JOIN US HERE:
https://up-edu.zoom.us/j/84236496726
Meeting ID: 842 3649 6726
Passcode: MustRead



This starts in an hour

#17776
i tried but the audio is fucked. many such cases
#17777
Started diving into The Global Perspective by Torkil Lauesen, really phenomenal combination of political analysis, guide to practical action, and autobiography.
#17778
Just read this article:
The Formation and Evolution of the Soviet Union’s Oil and Gas Dependence
in the hopes of learning something about the effects of Oil & Gas extraction in the USSR. Article is okay, seems like there was some impact but author concludes that problems lay first in the political system itself. Also USSR's bad agricultural policy, which got me thinking that China becoming food self-sufficient under Mao may be one of the most underrated achievements.
Got interested in the matter of the Soviet energy sector after reading Simon Pirani's excellent little book "Burning Up: a history of fossil consumption", which refers a lot to differences and similarities between the West and the USSR wrt energy consumption and efficiency. If anyone has some other works on the subject, I'm very interested!
#17779
William James - Talks to Teachers on Psychology (1899)
#17780
have been reading qui se nourrit de la famine en afrique? (roughly, who feeds themselves through the famine in africa) its a book about how imperialist pressure pushes for countries or regions to become monocultures which deeply damages their own subsistence and also damages the land they sow food on, using the examples of peanut culture in senegal and cotton in burkina faso. the book is divided in two parts, one about how development for white countries hinges on the exploitation of the third world, which added to the democratization of tourism helps breed an opinion of contempt and normalcy for starving third world masses. the second one is about food aid related organizations and other foreign aid is another racket that adds itself to foreign capital invested in various banana republics all over the world, to really drain those countries out of every penny they could have. im reading this and im thinking wow nice, theres figures and all, but this really isnt some high end shit. well for a book released in 1975 it definitely is, i researched the book name online and only could find archive pages and cuts out of academic journals from that year reviewing the book. searched the authors 'comité d'information sahel' and nothing came up. i bought the book from this old guy under the bridge selling books laying on cardboard with a little platform under the cardboard so theres no contact with the floor, the guy was selling books for 1euro a piece. it definitely holds up for a book released around the time samir amin, arghiri emmanuel etc were flourishing, which adds to the mystery about how its pretty much unknown
#17781
.

Edited by sovnarkoman ()

#17782

dizastar posted:

the mystery about how its pretty much unknown



dizastar posted:

its a book about how imperialist pressure pushes for countries or regions to become monocultures which deeply damages their own subsistence and also damages the land they sow food on



Euro-communist parties are allergic to sensible discussion of racism and imperialism in favor of misreadings of Lenin and "the unity of the working class". Mystery solved!
This post only slightly inspired by bitterness at the state of the communist movement

#17783
im writing a boring and dry essay about the epistemological impact of the pragmatist philosophy of william james and john dewey on education but in my head im writing a second better essay which is all in caps saying things like john dewey is the allen dulles of education
#17784
a thousand plateaus
#17785
does anyone know what the original source of the lin biao quote "the essence of revisionism is the fear of death" is? i've only been able to find people quoting it
#17786

lo posted:

does anyone know what the original source of the lin biao quote "the essence of revisionism is the fear of death" is? i've only been able to find people quoting it



I tried searching for it in Chinese and couldn't find anything.

#17787
As far as I can find, Alain Badiou is the source of the quote. He attributed it to Lin Biao in his afterword to Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy, said by Lin supposedly "in order to stigmatize as 'revisionist' the established and bureaucratic communism of the Russians".

However, the earliest reference to the quote I can find in Badiou's writing comes from Théorie de la contradiction, a pamphlet he wrote in 1975 for the Union des communistes de France marxiste-léniniste:

Au plus fort de la Révolution culturelle, on disait en Chine: l'essence du révisionnisme, c'est la peur de la mort. Cet énoncése divise, en sa part idéaliste et subjective son versant Lin Piao ­et sa part de vérité: le révisionniste ne supporte pas quela bourgeoisie meure.


I don't speak French, but Google Translate suggests he's saying that it's a slogan floating around during the GPCR rather than something Lin Biao said directly.

#17788
thanks. it's sort of funny if he actually just coined it himself and then attributed it to lin later
#17789
Here's a People's Daily article from 1966 https://cn.govopendata.com/renminribao/1966/12/1/3/ which says "现代修正主义者,由怕死保命到取消革命,完全背叛了无产阶级革命事业。" (The modern revisionists, going from fearing death and preserving their own lives to abolishing the revolution, have totally betrayed the revolutionary cause of the proletariat.) Not quite the sentiment of the Badiou quote. I don't think an English translation exists but the article is mentioned here https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/uk.hightide/transition.htm

#17790
it seems like the sentiment to me but what do i know
#17791
I guess what I mean is that it stops short of explicitly identifying the fear of death as the essence of revisionism, but I guess that could be the implication. The section containing that sentence is entitled "Live for the people, die for the people", and is about not fearing death and being willing to bravely sacrifice oneself for the people. The article only mentions revisionists two other times and only alongside bourgeois rightists and reactionaries as elements that must be struggled against, so fear of death is the only attribute being ascribed to them in this article.
#17792
i enjoyed badious chapter on the gpcr in "the communist hypothesis" but i tried to read being and event and had to put it away after 50 p. just didnt have clue what he's talking about, not even the mathy bits. sorry if i posted this in here already before
#17793

liceo posted:

a thousand plateaus



initial thoughts:

reflecting on writing in assemblages and recognized that benjamin utilized this method incessantly. this is perhaps the key to benjamin that i've never fully understood or noticed before. specifically, in moscow diaries, berlin childhood, and arcades project, every segment is effectively a scrap of paper glued to another scrap of paper, some water-damaged with bleeding blue ink, some pristine and crystalline. arcades the most of the three. that said, in MD and BC, benjamin made use of the 'arborescent' reality-image but smashed through it by negating beginning and end. everything is just there in itself and nothing really happens to it. where marx turned hegel upside down, benjamin holds a mirror to proust that methodically turns into a windowpane. benjamin is the only proust that remains, and the quasi-historical personal sentiment of lost time is replaced with a time that never existed and never will.

#17794

liceo posted:

liceo posted:

a thousand plateaus

benjamin is the only proust that remains, and the quasi-historical personal sentiment of lost time is replaced with a time that never existed and never will.


slightly talking out of my ass here but i think this is the sense in which deleuze talks about proust in difference & repetition, connecting it to a conception of the past which is never a 'past present' as its generally conceived but a past which always coexists as virtual with present experience in various degrees of 'contraction' or 'tension'
Bergson: "each present is only the entire past in its most contracted state"
Deleuze: "The paradox of pre-existence thus completes the other two, each past is contemporaneous with the present it was, the whole past coexists with the present in relation to which it is past, but the pure element of the past in general pre-exists the passing present"
its in the chapter repetition for itself if you're interested in looking at it, specifically the second passive synthesis of time (i glanced at my notes so im not sure if he acutally talks about proust here)

#17795
https://jeff-kaye.medium.com/a-real-flood-of-bacteria-and-germs-communications-intelligence-and-charges-of-u-s-4decafdc762
#17796
bromma pamphlets
#17797
i'm reading perry anderson's 'passages from antiquity to feudalism' and i'm learning all about different premodern modes of production, such as the slave mode of production, the feudal mode of production, and other auxiliary modes of production like the nomad pastoral mode of production. i heard that if you use a link cable with another copy of the book you can unlock a secret mode of production as well, which is helpful because i intend to collect all the modes of production and become a modes of production master.
#17798
I just started that book yesterday! Which you would have known if you were in the chatroom...
#17799

Belphegor posted:

I just started that book yesterday! Which you would have known if you were in the chatroom...


glad i got to see it

#17800

Belphegor posted:

I just started that book yesterday! Which you would have known if you were in the chatroom...


much like the nomadic pastoral mode of production after it has conquered a sedentary society, the chatroom is parasitic on the forum, merely stifling the growth of the forum's production while producing nothing of its own.