#17721

tears posted:

Marx and Education - Jean Anyon (2011)


1 chapter in and i can already say this book fucking sucks!

#17722

serafiym posted:

First half of the Espresso Stalinist article isn't even good commu-theology folks. Lenin and Stalin never went around like nitpicky nerds with Marxism and the National Question trying to dispel something like Zionism by saying it was unscientific. Obviously it eventually formed a real country. Those national criteria Stalin laid out are important in that they would outline ethnogenesis campaigns which Bolsheviks would apply across the colonized Central Asian periphery; colonial and clan governments were replaced with national governments of trained native bureaucrats, common culture was funded by the state, borders were drawn, standardized written languages were made and taught. A foundation of Soviet policy was creating new nations.



writing on this is one of the things that turned me from anarchoteen to marxoid. put me back in I'm not done yet!!

#17723
Finished Radical Hamilton, now reading The Anarchy: the relentless rise of the east india company
#17724
reading the crackhead clubhouse phenazepam posts again and thinking about the gun nut in Europe who got arrested and institutionalized and thought he'd time-traveled into the 19th century, and how he got his wife to sit down at his keyboard and type all his posts for a week under his direction but she had no idea what was going on because she didn't know English
#17725
heres the best thing to come of the phenazepam posts btw

Spoiler!

Edited by kinch ()

#17726
anybuggy read "Schooling in Capitalist America: Educational Reform and the Contradictions of Economic Life" by bowles and gintis (1976)? im gonna read it next i think
#17727
do Monopoly Capital by Paul Sweezy and Labor and Monopoly Capital by Harry Braverman still hold today or are the topics completely covered and updated by contemporaries like Zak Cope and John Smith? cuz i found both in french edition so itll be an easier read than english but the prices r a bit steep so im asking before making the move
#17728

dizastar posted:

do Monopoly Capital by Paul Sweezy and Labor and Monopoly Capital by Harry Braverman still hold today or are the topics completely covered and updated by contemporaries like Zak Cope and John Smith? cuz i found both in french edition so itll be an easier read than english but the prices r a bit steep so im asking before making the move



Another one you might want to check out is Value Chains: The New Economic Imperialism by Intan Suwandi

I don’t think Sweezy covers labor aristocracy or value flows in his work, iirc its main point is about military spending ballooning under late capitalism instead of going to welfare state spending

#17729
reading Finance As Warfare by Michael Hudson. really good so far. land rents and credit interest extract more surplus today than industrial profit. hudson centers the land question, and what he calls the new enclosure movement, ravaging the third world. the new enclosures sometimes "gift" land property to their current tenants, in order to make it available in the future to capture by creditors (like land in the U$).
#17730
id cop the baran and sweezy book, they remain extremely influential and central to the analysis of people like amin etc and in that way despite it not being up to date might also function as a missing link of sorts
#17731
reading hegel (phenomenology of spirit). first time really venturing seriously into his writing. using stern's companion (from routledge) as a reference text + the analysis by findlay in the back of the book, which simply seems pretentious and ambiguous at best. attempting to read first and then read over the reference texts, then re-read.

throughout the first chapter (excluding the preface and introduction), i've been thinking about how various atomized academic fields in many ways seem to each be stuck on the different facets of his argument. for example:

1.) in the first section (a. consciousness, i. sense-certainty), he describes the inadequacy of immediate sense-data. empirical science (particularly oriented toward humans) attempts, in my view, to get as close to immediate sense-data as possible; having achieved an appearance of this, it can claim one notion of what it takes to be objectivity. but hegel quickly shatters the strength of that image as an inadequate representation of the object.

2.) in the second section (a. consciousness, ii. perception), perception is put forth as a potential alternative to the sense-certainty dilemma. perception recognizes (in his formulation) that every object has many parts but is nonetheless a single object. he shows that the parts and sum of those parts are each necessary facets of the object. i thought of constructivism thinking here as something that exemplifies this sort of perception: in recognizing the many facets of a single object, constructivist analysis fails (in my interpretation of hegel) in that it does not adequately reconstitute those facets into a unified object. in other words, the task of constructivisim is to understand the facets of how reality appears but inadequately represents reality because it does not treat the parts as equal to the whole. in hegel's terms, it is deceived because it does not honor the contingency of each foundation of an object (that it is one-many and many-one at once).

3.) in the third section (a. consciousness, iii. force and understanding), it becomes clear that consciousness cannot form adequate representations of reality without forming a representation of the mediated nature of our knowing reality first. i think this is interesting for materialism in that it is the analysis of the contradiction of certain conditions. in this way, i don't necessarily think that marx turned hegel on his head, but rather really began the long process of reconciling the force (i.e. contradictions) of material phenomena so that they can be understood as an object in itself. we see this was a successful project because, even without a good vocabulary, social struggle exemplifies the contradiction that is at once sense-certainty (it is felt in a real way without analysis by those engaged in the struggle), it is perceived (known and recognized for its one and many facets and can be analyzed as such, and both of which are foundational to emancipation in relation to struggle), and its very existence is the contradiction between two forms of life (here communism and capitalism and what each of those entail for social reality).

haven't read further yet
#17732

toyot posted:

reading Finance As Warfare by Michael Hudson. really good so far. land rents and credit interest extract more surplus today than industrial profit. hudson centers the land question, and what he calls the new enclosure movement, ravaging the third world. the new enclosures sometimes "gift" land property to their current tenants, in order to make it available in the future to capture by creditors (like land in the U$).


I think its probably important to note that industrial profits today should usually be considered as a point along the same chain as financial interest rates, as opposed to being separate types of surplus value extraction. The corporations are taking out loans from the big banks to finance their industrial activities, and the interest payments that these financial firms get are shares of industrial profits, and are necessary preconditions of them. Imo they should be considered separate elements of the same apparatus for circulating capital. In a sense, these financial firms act as centralizers of capital that then gets disbursed into different industrial sectors. I dont want to say anything about the contents of what you were reading, idk how they present this, but i think its meaningful to note

Edited by c_man ()

#17733
he'd probably strongly agree with half of what you said, and strongly disagree with half. he says this blending of ebitda with FIRE/rentier extraction by modern economists is a more recent ideological trend, that classical economists went to lengths to disentangle (in the mercantile era, a major econ question was how to help surplus flow to nascent real industry, rather than to idle landlords, or as debt service to dutch banks). the late re-entanglement of FIRE's surplus and industrial profit, obscures the creditor offensive the last 40 years... for instance, especially the last 20 years here, there's been major asset price inflation, in land and in stocks, but no wage inflation. this is consistent with rentier extraction, not a wage/price spiral spurred on by industry... the FIRE sector prefers high asset prices, they'd rather you go into $600k of housing debt than $300k, for the same house. more surplus flows to debt service this way. he would absolutely agree that financial firms act as centralizers of capital, and they act as central planners to inflate assets and petition central banks to lower interest rates, so as to leverage cheap treasuries on one side of their balance sheet, and extract dividends and higher-interest debts/securities, closer to the real economy, on the other. i'd pick it up... it's pamphlet-length which has about been my attention span this year

also reading Number Theory by Andrews, and forcing myself to do the proofs... i thought up a complete algebra, with only 4 'words' in it, which can reach the integers, rational, irrational, complex numbers, and (with a change of basis, preserving the algebra's features) the transcendental numbers... b/c there are only 4 words, it can be fully represented as 00, 01, 10, and 11... trying to understand it, so i can someday build an algebra computer... no more floating point error in my scientific calculations... for instance, the square root of 2 in this language is exactly 1010011000... combined w/ the generalized distributive property i posted about in math thread, a state machine could represent all of number and also all of function space on bare metal, unambiguously, and without a compiler or much of an OS! there is an energy tradeoff: unlike floating point systems, it is not one-to-one with integer, meaning integers require more bits (energy) to store (there are infinite ways to represent each integer in this language: infinity-to-one, whereas 569 means exactly one number, and there's only one way to say that one number, in decimal). but, it scales bitwise better to massive integers, or numbers close to zero. in my tests so far the negative tradeoff appears localized to just the small integers. many rational and all irrational numbers in floating point systems need infinite bits, but in this, numbers like 1/3 are made in around 10 bits, unlike, 0.3333333333333....
#17734

toyot posted:

he'd probably strongly agree with half of what you said, and strongly disagree with half. he says this blending of ebitda with FIRE/rentier extraction by modern economists is a more recent ideological trend, that classical economists went to lengths to disentangle (in the mercantile era, a major econ question was how to help surplus flow to nascent real industry, rather than to idle landlords, or as debt service to dutch banks). the late re-entanglement of FIRE's surplus and industrial profit, obscures the creditor offensive the last 40 years... for instance, especially the last 20 years here, there's been major asset price inflation, in land and in stocks, but no wage inflation. this is consistent with rentier extraction, not a wage/price spiral spurred on by industry... the FIRE sector prefers high asset prices, they'd rather you go into $600k of housing debt than $300k, for the same house. more surplus flows to debt service this way. he would absolutely agree that financial firms act as centralizers of capital, and they act as central planners to inflate assets and petition central banks to lower interest rates, so as to leverage cheap treasuries on one side of their balance sheet, and extract dividends and higher-interest debts/securities, closer to the real economy, on the other. i'd pick it up... it's pamphlet-length which has about been my attention span this year


my point was more to emphasize that it's a repartitioning of surplus value, and generally the source of funding for industry in the first place, rather than a "new" or "different" way of generating a surplus. that is to say, that the only reason the FIRE sector has this room to expand into consumer debt in this way is that there was a substantial portion of surplus value flowing to amerikan consumers in the first place. i also think that its probably useful not to take the language of "real" vs "financial" economy too seriously, as opposed to identifying different sectors for managing and allocating capital to different sources of surplus value.

toyot posted:

also reading Number Theory by Andrews, and forcing myself to do the proofs... i thought up a complete algebra, with only 4 'words' in it, which can reach the integers, rational, irrational, complex numbers, and (with a change of basis, preserving the algebra's features) the transcendental numbers... b/c there are only 4 words, it can be fully represented as 00, 01, 10, and 11... trying to understand it, so i can someday build an algebra computer... no more floating point error in my scientific calculations... for instance, the square root of 2 in this language is exactly 1010011000... combined w/ the generalized distributive property i posted about in math thread, a state machine could represent all of number and also all of function space on bare metal, unambiguously, and without a compiler or much of an OS! there is an energy tradeoff: unlike floating point systems, it is not one-to-one with integer, meaning integers require more bits (energy) to store (there are infinite ways to represent each integer in this language: infinity-to-one, whereas 569 means exactly one number, and there's only one way to say that one number, in decimal). but, it scales bitwise better to massive integers, or numbers close to zero. in my tests so far the negative tradeoff appears localized to just the small integers. many rational and all irrational numbers in floating point systems need infinite bits, but in this, numbers like 1/3 are made in around 10 bits, unlike, 0.3333333333333....


i think it sounds more like you have a number system rather than an algebra there? if it maps to the real numbers (or whatever) that's already an algebra, with a ring structure

#17735

c_man posted:

my point was more to emphasize that it's a repartitioning of surplus value, and generally the source of funding for industry in the first place, rather than a "new" or "different" way of generating a surplus. that is to say, that the only reason the FIRE sector has this room to expand into consumer debt in this way is that there was a substantial portion of surplus value flowing to amerikan consumers in the first place. i also think that its probably useful not to take the language of "real" vs "financial" economy too seriously, as opposed to identifying different sectors for managing and allocating capital to different sources of surplus value.



right. it's an ancient method of accumulating surplus. its modern iteration (like merging FI with RE) has some specific features. i'd be interested to hear more of your thoughts and readings on monetary theory... the insight i'm tracking is that, inflation isn't everywhere at once. when the money supply expands, it expands first on bankers' balance sheets. they use new money to bid up the prices of assets, then that feeds them continuously via higher debt service. so this inflation begins with asset prices (1). then the debt service squeezes the local working class, creates the wage pressure (rather than rising prices of consumer goods in the store). U$ consumers then need higher wages to afford their homes, educations, and debt service (2). but indebtedness isn't as evenly spread as wages for a given job. so higher wages not headed to debt service, afford more goods from the global working class. then finally inflation is felt by rest of the world (3). i guess we'll see. only (1) is observable currently.

i think it sounds more like you have a number system rather than an algebra there? if it maps to the real numbers (or whatever) that's already an algebra, with a ring structure



yea it's a number system when using purely the 4 words. semantic overlap in the number system, i assign special characters, like parentheses, separators to make vectors, and variables. semantic overlap meaning for instance, there are 5 unique, low-bit ways to write the number 1, so i re-assign 2 of them to mean ( and ). the special characters allow it to perform algebra. the semantic 'overhead' to do matrix multiplication is maybe 50 bits, vs as an extreme example, 12GB to install matlab. i'll finish the writeup this week and post it this month. this came out of exploring the unit algebra, i wrote about in math thread.

#17736
Was flipping through my copy of Stalin's Foundations of Leninism and I came across a stamp on the last page:

Canada is a colony of U.S. imperialism. To end our exploitation, to build a new Canada where the people hold the real power, we must unite patriotic and progressive Canadians in a fighting organization, dedicated to achievement of independence and socialism. This is the aim of the.... CANADIAN LIBERATION MOVEMENT



Which led me down a hilarious rabbithole trying to find the incredible geniuses behind this movement.

The CLM was the most ardent supporter of the “Canada as neo-colony” position. Following this position, the CLM argued for a two-stage revolution with the first stage being a national liberation struggle against U.S imperialism in a front that would also include patriotic capitalists.



Thought yall would get a kick out of it lmao

It's almost inspiring in a way. Seeing how far we have come. No one believes this anymore, I guess some people act as if its true.

#17737

toyot posted:

yea it's a number system when using purely the 4 words. semantic overlap in the number system, i assign special characters, like parentheses, separators to make vectors, and variables. semantic overlap meaning for instance, there are 5 unique, low-bit ways to write the number 1, so i re-assign 2 of them to mean ( and ). the special characters allow it to perform algebra. the semantic 'overhead' to do matrix multiplication is maybe 50 bits, vs as an extreme example, 12GB to install matlab. i'll finish the writeup this week and post it this month. this came out of exploring the unit algebra, i wrote about in math thread.



I would love to hear more about this since it sounds to me like the difficulty is going to be in transforming an "algebraic literal" into a decimal or float. In what sense do you have variables? Is something like 3x+1 a literal?

Off the top of my head I can only think of numeric low-overhead computation sometimes involving matrices and symbolic computation with typically high overhead. It seems like you are trying to do both of these.

#17738
i'm reading anti-oedipus after 10 years of saying i would
#17739
Reading Jakarta Method after that one person posted a review then took it down. Highly recommend reading it
#17740

second_axiom posted:

i'm reading anti-oedipus after 10 years of saying i would


my french is absolutely terrible but it was still easier for me to read in the original french, so if you have a bit of the language and are struggling I'd recommend trying that

#17741

my french is absolutely terrible but it was still easier for me to read in the original french, so if you have a bit of the language and are struggling I'd recommend trying that


i don't know any french, just "intermediate" japanese and some mandarin, the latter of which is easier to fake due to said better japanese mastery

#17742

shriekingviolet posted:

second_axiom posted:

i'm reading anti-oedipus after 10 years of saying i would

my french is absolutely terrible but it was still easier for me to read in the original french, so if you have a bit of the language and are struggling I'd recommend trying that


in what sense was it easier? i recently reread a-o and have been slowly working my way through thousand plateaus and difference & repetition for the past few months, and ive been curious about the tonal/aesthetic differences between the english and original versions

#17743

ribaraca posted:

in what sense was it easier?


very carefully

#17744

ribaraca posted:

in what sense was it easier? i recently reread a-o and have been slowly working my way through thousand plateaus and difference & repetition for the past few months, and ive been curious about the tonal/aesthetic differences between the english and original versions


I mostly just think that all of the idiomatic jargon Deleuze uses flows more intuitively in the original french. I think that how you approach the text will affect how much that matters, if you take a very systematic approach with the assistance of readers/commentary then it probably doesn't make much difference. If you're a proud doofus like me and you just beat your head against the entire thing until you start getting a broad sense of him and then use that as a scaffold to start pulling out the particulars, it helps.

I should revisit some Deleuze, it's been a decade. Maybe I'm full of shit

#17745
Anyone have a book recommendation on German anti-fascist resistance and organization before and during the Great Patriotic War?
#17746

shriekingviolet posted:

ribaraca posted:

in what sense was it easier? i recently reread a-o and have been slowly working my way through thousand plateaus and difference & repetition for the past few months, and ive been curious about the tonal/aesthetic differences between the english and original versions

I mostly just think that all of the idiomatic jargon Deleuze uses flows more intuitively in the original french. I think that how you approach the text will affect how much that matters, if you take a very systematic approach with the assistance of readers/commentary then it probably doesn't make much difference. If you're a proud doofus like me and you just beat your head against the entire thing until you start getting a broad sense of him and then use that as a scaffold to start pulling out the particulars, it helps.

I should revisit some Deleuze, it's been a decade. Maybe I'm full of shit

that makes sense, since i think the 'flow' or general aesthetic of the argument is more relevant to deleuze than it is to many other authors. the first time i read anti-oedipus i did it the same way, and i do think it lends itself to that. part of the problem, and why i tried to read it more systematically this time, is because the intuitiveness of some of the concepts, coupled with the deliberate subversion of alot of the systems of thinking that constitute a kind of historical rigour for 'thinking through' things, makes it really easy to fall into a vulgar or superficial reading and use of the concepts if you dont somehow check yourself and try to systematize things

#17747

shriekingviolet posted:

I should revisit some Deleuze, it's been a decade. Maybe I'm full of shit



same but instead of rereading AO or 1k plateaus I want to read difference and repetition for the first time

#17748
congrats to discipline on her new book https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50997978-culture-warlords
#17749
Greetings Comrades!
We are excited to announce that Foreign Languages Press is co-sponsoring an online book launch with BAYAN, and the University of the Philippines-Center for International Studies (UPCIS) of two books by Pao-yu Ching:

From Victory to Defeat: China’s Socialist Road and Capitalist Reversal

And

Rethinking Socialism: What Is Socialist Transition?

The books will be reviews by José Maria Sison, founder of the Communist Party of the Philippines and J. Moufawad-Paul, writer, philosopher and author of From Victory to Defeat’s introduction.

The book launch will feature a message from the author, who will be available during an open forum to answer questions.

FLP will be giving a short message, as well as Carol Araullo, Chairperson of Bayan.

Philippines: Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 9AM
North America (West Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 5PM
North America (East Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 8PM
* please note the time correction

JOIN US HERE:
https://up-edu.zoom.us/j/84236496726
Meeting ID: 842 3649 6726
Passcode: MustRead
#17750

karphead posted:

congrats to discipline on her new book https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50997978-culture-warlords



is this a meta joke on finding Dylann Roof's manifesto, because that's definitely not discipline

#17751
oh word? i thought it was for some reason
#17752
the state nobility: elite schools in the field of power - bourdieu (1998)
#17753
Plutarch's Lives
#17754

Populares posted:

Plutarch's Lives


what was he doing with more than one, seems a bit greedy

#17755

tears posted:

the state nobility: elite schools in the field of power - bourdieu (1998)


#17756


#17757

tears posted:

the state nobility: elite schools in the field of power - bourdieu (1998)



i was just reading this (title: The Descendants of Former Aristocratic Families
in Hungary at the Turn of the 21st Century) yesterday, unfortunately it was not very insightful: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EPbS7ELXnSFkLMC2ZcCLpVfAkAIXXg5E/view?usp=sharing

#17758

pogfan1996 posted:

Reading Jakarta Method after that one person posted a review then took it down. Highly recommend reading it



it's still up in the pdf forum

#17759
Two book launches in November!
Dear Comrades,
We will have TWO separate book launches in November!
On Saturday, November 21 we're launching two New Roads books:

Booklaunch1
Of Concepts and Methods by K. Murali (Ajith), a collection of essays including classics like “The Maoist Party,” as well as new work on Postisms, Brahmanist Hindhu Fascism and Materialist Ethics.

And

Operation Green Hunt in India by Adolfo Naya Fernandez a succinct text that leads the reader through the damning evidence that the strategy known as “Hearts and Minds,” put into practice by the Indian State with “Operation Green Hunt” is actually a genocide.

This book launch will feature a panel discussion about topics covered in Ajith’s new book, moderated by acclaimed journalist, K. P. Sethunath with Comrade Ajith, Adolfo Naya Fernandez, Sidhartha Samtani from People's Magazine and Sourav Banerjee from Towards a New Dawn as panelists.
India: Saturday, 21 November @ 9:30PM
Europe: Saturday, 21 November @ 6PM
North America East: Saturday, 21 November @ 12PM (noon)
North America West: Saturday, 21 November @ 9AM
Booklaunch2
Also, Foreign Languages Press is co-sponsoring the Philippines launch of Pao-yu Ching’s “From Victory to Defeat” and “Rethinking Socialism” with BAYAN and the University of the Philippines-Center for International Studies (UPCIS).

The books will be reviewed by:
José Maria Sison (founder of the Communist Party of the Philippines) and
J. Moufawad-Paul (writer, philosopher and teacher)
The program will include a message from Pao-yu Ching, as well as an open forum for Q & A.
Philippines: Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 9AM
North America (West Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 5PM
North America (East Coast): Friday, November 6, 2020 at 8PM
Zoom link: https://up-edu.zoom.us/j/84236496726%3Cbr%3E%3C/strong%3EMeeting
ID: 842 3649 6726
Passcode: MustRead
#17760
Turning Money into Rebellion is a fun read, it’s structured into four parts: background on the blekingegade group, an essay from a couple members on their actions, an interview, then internal documents. Really interesting deep dive into one potential expression of a labor aristocracy analysis