#121
i have found acupuncture to be insanely effective for back pain from my experience
#122
i get confused by people who scoff at chiropractic work but in the same breath recommend acupuncture. not that i have a problem with acupuncture, but they both seem a little out there and its odd to deride one while embracing the other. cant we just agree that theyre both dubious practices based on pseudoscience and thats ok?
#123
upload yourself to the cloud and be free of human pain forever
#124
Chiropracty kills and maims and is actively pseudoscientific and purposely designed to make your pain worse in the long term and keep coming back, accupuncture is content with low key mysticism and isn't even a trillionth as predatory. chiropractors are class enemies and will require extensive reeducation
#125
yes, as lenin famously said: rely on the physiotherapist, establish agreement with the accupuncturist, never for a moment cease fighting against the chiropractor
#126

Although we should have an all-round and correct understanding of Chinese medicine, Chinese medicine also has to transform itself. We must accept this slice of our old heritage critically. To look down upon Chinese medicine is not correct. To claim that everything about Chinese medicine is good, or too good, this is also not correct. Chinese and Western medicines must unite.


- Mao Zedong

#127
i didn't want to shit on exercise too much and dissuade anyone from doing it. i was merely noting that it shouldn't be the primary strategy for weight loss - calorie reduction is much more efficient. however, if you put in a pretty-good amount of effort exercising, you can easily burn over an extra half-pound a week, which isn't nothing. still, the primary benefits of exercise are improved mood and cardiorespiratory health, not necessarily weight loss. remember that you are a big mammal. the effort it takes to keep your body hot and moving 24 hours a day is much more than the extra energy it takes to run for half an hour, which is good because if that wasn't the case your ancestors all would have starved to death chasing down dinosaurs to turn into kitchen gadgets
#128

tears posted:

yes, as lenin famously said: rely on the physiotherapist, establish agreement with the accupuncturist, never for a moment cease fighting against the chiropractor



rhizzone.txt

#129

le_nelson_mandela_face posted:

let's say you run 3 miles at a ten minute mile in decent shape. this constitutes roughly 600 calories depending on your weight. a pound is 3500 calories. you burned maybe 500, maybe 700, whatever. this is the equivalent of one human meal, or 1/3 an american meal


I have some math for you

If I was leading a "sedentary" lifestyle and eating 2700 calories a day, I'd gain weight. But the weight gain is only from the last 750 calories, the rest is used in my normal metabolism. Now let's say I add 25 minutes of cardio four days a week and don't change my diet. Each session burns ~300 calories. Do I keep gaining weight, since I'm still bringing in 750 calories a day beyond maintenance? No, because now I'm approaching "moderately active". The cumulative effect of exercise outpowers any nutritional change you'll be able to commit to - good luck dropping 750 calories a day out of your 2700 to stop yourself gaining weight.

So now my daily intake is approaching the maintenance rate for my activity level, and I only have to reduce my intake by 5-10% - cutting a daily candy bar, for example - to secure this position. Meanwhile, because I'm exercising regularly, I'm replacing bodyfat with muscle, increasing my metabolism and allowing me to exercise harder more often. Here we see a good reason not to use bodyweight to measure overall health, because someone in this position can gain weight while they get healthier (because muscle weighs more by volume than bodyfat). The nice thing about cardio is that duration and intensity are always achievable. If you can only do 2 miles in 25 minutes at a brisk walk, that is still nearly as effective as me running further in the same time if we're both sweating and panting afterward.

The way you are looking at this assumes that if I need 1950 calories to maintain, and I'm eating 2700 calories a day but burning 300, that is similar to not exercising and keeping a 2400 calorie daily intake. That viewpoint ignores that the best ways to improve your nutrition and cut bodyfat are not about calorie counting. These include carb cycling, drinking water before eating and snacking, setting up a healthier eating schedule, and exercising early in the morning on an empty stomach.

#130

swampman posted:

le_nelson_mandela_face posted:

let's say you run 3 miles at a ten minute mile in decent shape. this constitutes roughly 600 calories depending on your weight. a pound is 3500 calories. you burned maybe 500, maybe 700, whatever. this is the equivalent of one human meal, or 1/3 an american meal

I have some math for you

If I was leading a "sedentary" lifestyle and eating 2700 calories a day, I'd gain weight. But the weight gain is only from the last 750 calories, the rest is used in my normal metabolism. Now let's say I add 25 minutes of cardio four days a week and don't change my diet. Each session burns ~300 calories. Do I keep gaining weight, since I'm still bringing in 750 calories a day beyond maintenance? No, because now I'm approaching "moderately active". The cumulative effect of exercise outpowers any nutritional change you'll be able to commit to - good luck dropping 750 calories a day out of your 2700 to stop yourself gaining weight.

So now my daily intake is approaching the maintenance rate for my activity level, and I only have to reduce my intake by 5-10% - cutting a daily candy bar, for example - to secure this position. Meanwhile, because I'm exercising regularly, I'm replacing bodyfat with muscle, increasing my metabolism and allowing me to exercise harder more often. Here we see a good reason not to use bodyweight to measure overall health, because someone in this position can gain weight while they get healthier (because muscle weighs more by volume than bodyfat). The nice thing about cardio is that duration and intensity are always achievable. If you can only do 2 miles in 25 minutes at a brisk walk, that is still nearly as effective as me running further in the same time if we're both sweating and panting afterward.

The way you are looking at this assumes that if I need 1950 calories to maintain, and I'm eating 2700 calories a day but burning 300, that is similar to not exercising and keeping a 2400 calorie daily intake. That viewpoint ignores that the best ways to improve your nutrition and cut bodyfat are not about calorie counting. These include carb cycling, drinking water before eating and snacking, setting up a healthier eating schedule, and exercising early in the morning on an empty stomach.



hey man, i'm not arguing with this. exercise can be helpful to a weight loss program. my point is simply that calorie restriction in the diet is the most important. if instead of 2700 you were eating 3500 calories a day, as americans regularly do, then 4 days a week at 300/calories a session wouldn't be sufficient to lose weight.

#131
Ok this "business insider" article from June claims says the average amerikan eats 3600 calories a day. I admit i didn't remember it was that bad. The average Amerikan is 5'10" which at 35% bodyfat implies an equilibrium weight of 400lbs with no exercise. At that intake the average person is probably shitting a good amount of undigested food. God damnit I hate this stupid fucking culture
#132
i worked out and ate right today so far. gj me.
#133

swampman posted:

Ok this "business insider" article from June claims says the average amerikan eats 3600 calories a day. I admit i didn't remember it was that bad. The average Amerikan is 5'10" which at 35% bodyfat implies an equilibrium weight of 400lbs with no exercise. At that intake the average person is probably shitting a good amount of undigested food. God damnit I hate this stupid fucking culture



omg

#134
tip for people starting out an exercise program: most of the bodybuilding beginners' courses are good, and the bodybuilding advice that isn't good is obviously, discernibly insane (how do i modify my vacuum cleaner to suck my blood so i can make weight). however, the general "health sphere" is full of hucksters and hippies, or both, the huckpy, so tread lightly. diet and exercise work, everything beyond that should be treated with suspicion. look at this bullshit i just read. "to find healthy solutions we should return to the wisdom of our great-grandmothers" ah yes the secret to health i've been missing is that i should not drink water that has been handled by Jews
#135
i think people that would normally know better fall for that stuff because they don't actually want to get off their ass and lift a weight
#136
I ran 15 miles
#137
[account deactivated]
#138
DA DAT DAAA
#139
[account deactivated]
#140
Funny, I seem to recall that your kids emancipated themselves bc you wouldn't stop referring to your boners as "gains"
#141
[account deactivated]
#142
started using http://www.dietcontroller.com/ because it's weird to give livestrong/some app your full diet data history. this contains the USDA food database, comprehensive to the extent that 'Milk, Human, Mature' was easier to log than soy milk.

mods pls change name to Milk, Human, Mature
#143
[account deactivated]
#144
I've been Texas fat since I was a kid eating cheap McDonalds burgers after school twice/three times a week. I don't know if I remember correctly, but back then I think we had food stamps usable at McDonalds. Someone has to fix that please. After that I spent middle and high school in Qatar and my parents came into money, but I got depressed and obese-r. Kept up the shitty food habits but with worse food and more quantities of it. I still have no clue how to lose weight many years later, just can't find it in me to actually do it. I've always been mostly apathetic towards it, even though it so obviously limits my social capacity and has annoying health effects. I can't cook for shit, and food where I am is all trash, but at least I've shifted somewhat from eating fastfood takeout 3-4 times a week to having a salad as part of my lunch most days.

Edited by Caesura109 ()

#145
Learn to cook. I know it's hard to pick up a new skill when you're an adult, and even harder when you have a busy working life, but it's a great investment in your well being and just a cool thing to be able to do. The "healthy" options in most fast food are usually just smaller portions with some superficial pittance of reduced fat but still absolutely loaded with sugar, and sit down restaurants usually aren't actually much better. Knowing how to cook a variety of your own meals will go a long way towards improving your health even before you get to fancy stuff like adhering to a strict diet (unless you do trashy goon cooking like a kilo of bacon every meal.)

Plan your meals for the week, especially for dinner: they don't have to be portion controlled nutrition balanced from the get go, but just knowing what you're cooking and what you're shopping for in advance will make it easier to get around to cooking for yourself day to day. Figure out what works better for your own eating habits and daily routine: do you like making a variety of smaller meals each day, or are you cool with prepping a big batch of something in advance and having leftovers for a couple days? Combine that with learning good shopping habits and you'll save a lot of money too, getting caught with nothing to eat and no mental energy to figure out something is how expensive and shitty garbage food will sneak back in. If there are availability problems ie you live in a 'food ghetto' where easily getting stuff like a variety real produce is a logistical difficulty or unaffordable because of company store bullshit, make plans with friends to go on big bi-weekly or monthly shopping trips further out to stock up on ingredients, it can be a nice social outing.

I'm lucky that my parents made me start working in the kitchen when I was 7, so cooking comes naturally, but if a lack of kitchen skills and knowledge is holding you back then try learning by helping out friends who can cook (another nice social activity) or see if there are free/cheap community classes near you for adults learning to cook: you're not the only one with these difficulties, and there's no shame in it!
#146
i love to cook food; making big batches of vegetable based food and freezing in portions is a good way to make health food without having to spend lots of time making food. what sort of food do you like to eat? talk to me about food. food
#147
[account deactivated]
#148
no, sorry, never heard of it
#149
[account deactivated]
#150

Caesura109 posted:

I've been Texas fat since I was a kid eating cheap McDonalds burgers after school twice/three times a week. I don't know if I remember correctly, but back then I think we had food stamps usable at McDonalds. Someone has to fix that please. After that I spent middle and high school in Qatar and my parents came into money, but I got depressed and obese-r. Kept up the shitty food habits but with worse food and more quantities of it. I still have no clue how to lose weight many years later, just can't find it in me to actually do it.

Pick a goal that is not directly about your weight that you will inevitably have to lose weight to achieve. Running a marathon would be one example. The reality is that you can run a marathon if you do your homework. You can start by doing a couch-to-5k program while joining a weight loss group. The point of the weight loss group isn't your weight, it's to help get you the finish line of the 5k. After you do that, start a couch-to-10k program. Then enroll in a half marathon and train for that. Every problem and obstacle between you and running a marathon has been shown to be surmountable by the many ex-fat people who have eventually run marathons.

Its also correct that you should learn to cook.. steaming vegetables is a good place to start

#151

tears posted:

i love to cook food; making big batches of vegetable based food and freezing in portions is a good way to make health food without having to spend lots of time making food. what sort of food do you like to eat? talk to me about food. food

Honestly yall need to go start a food thread, I know this thread has "eat" in title but its about getting shredded

#152
cooking really isn't hard, either, now that we have the internet all the time. google whatever basic dish you think sounds good, follow the recipe. it works. do NOT read the comments unless you want 5000 stories about how somebody replaced the carrots with jalapenos and the flour with baking soda and it came out shitty
#153
it's getting really cold so i got a trainer for my bicycle but it doesn't really provide enough resistance for a good workout :\ wish i'd got one with adjustable magnet. last year i just kept riding all winter whenever it wasn't icy or snowing cuz i wanted to prove to myself i could endure the cold i guess.
#154
using some comprehensive cookbook like how to cook everything is better than using some random internet recipes for someone with no experience cooking i think, because it teaches about cooking tools and techniques in an accessible way, and its recipes tend to be grouped in a way that quickly introduce you to seeing various kinds of dishes as variations on some fundamentals. a lot of random internet recipes are pretty bad and a novice doesn't really know how to tell a good one from a bad one. they also tend to have misleading and intimidating pretentious stuff like "you have to use kosher salt". you can find a copy on the secret pdf forum
#155

roseweird posted:

using some comprehensive cookbook like how to cook everything is better than using some random internet recipes for someone with no experience cooking i think, because it teaches about cooking tools and techniques in an accessible way, and its recipes tend to be grouped in a way that quickly introduce you to seeing various kinds of dishes as variations on some fundamentals. a lot of random internet recipes are pretty bad and a novice doesn't really know how to tell a good one from a bad one. they also tend to have misleading and intimidating pretentious stuff like "you have to use kosher salt". you can find a copy on the secret pdf forum



that's probably true

#156

shriekingviolet posted:

Plan your meals for the week, especially for dinner: they don't have to be portion controlled nutrition balanced from the get go, but just knowing what you're cooking and what you're shopping for in advance will make it easier to get around to cooking for yourself day to day. Figure out what works better for your own eating habits and daily routine: do you like making a variety of smaller meals each day, or are you cool with prepping a big batch of something in advance and having leftovers for a couple days? Combine that with learning good shopping habits and you'll save a lot of money too, getting caught with nothing to eat and no mental energy to figure out something is how expensive and shitty garbage food will sneak back in.


Can't stress enough how important this is if you're on a limited budget. Not only does planning ahead at least a few days help stop you from wasting money on fast food dinners but it keeps you away from the store longer, where even more temptation lurks in the form of shiny garbage snacks

#157

le_nelson_mandela_face posted:

replaced the carrots with jalapenos


not seeing the problem with this

#158

Petrol posted:





omg

#159

roseweird posted:

using some comprehensive cookbook like how to cook everything is better than using some random internet recipes for someone with no experience cooking i think, because it teaches about cooking tools and techniques in an accessible way, and its recipes tend to be grouped in a way that quickly introduce you to seeing various kinds of dishes as variations on some fundamentals. a lot of random internet recipes are pretty bad and a novice doesn't really know how to tell a good one from a bad one. they also tend to have misleading and intimidating pretentious stuff like "you have to use kosher salt". you can find a copy on the secret pdf forum



yes +1 to all this. epicurious is good signal to noise but for more bougie cooking

there's no shame starting with boxed foods from the always-quiet aisle. boxed couscous, red beans n rice, rice-a-roni, it's mostly starch, just add chopped veggies. also canned soups are healthier and cheaper and faster than fast food. bread is the cheapest food you can make, you can get 80,000 calories of bread flour for around $15 / 50lb bag. that's eating for about $0.40 / day, not counting oven heat $.

#160
Buy this https://www.amazon.com/New-Best-Recipe-Cooks-Illustrated/dp/0936184744/