#521
#522

#523
#524
meanwhile
#525

lol
#526
#527

sovnarkoman posted:

meanwhile


#528
Great news for those who admire the for sure 100% still alive and not dead Queen of England!
#529

all the rail workers in the alive queen's United Kingdom are going on strike, probably the teachers too pretty soon.

#530




#531
Will it ever end!
#532
i have covid fuck this country
#533
all the best tears.
#534
little rant: school has gone to shit, constant staff absences due to covid mean we are running just to stay still - plus there is a constant cycle of sick kids - i am teaching some classes this week with 7 students missing. attendance never really picked back up "after" covid and it has declined again as the plague rips through yet again. students often tell me that they do not have a clue what the fuck we are doing or why. the absence of staff and proliferation of cover lessons has ment that behaviour has declined to the point that sometimes i feel like i am a one woman disciplinarian holding the line against utter chaos. ive already gained a reputation as one of the strictest teachers in the school which would be grim but necessary since half of SLT think its their role to be super nice to children who i have kicked out of class for bad behaviour and teachers role to be mean assholes - wtf - but it is tempered by the fact that all the kids know that i am smart as shit so at least i have some respect rather than just miss tears will set you a detention if you look at her funny. i spend too much time setting and following through with detentions and chasing parents with little help from SLT or my department in an effort to get the actual climate our department needs for learning to take place. meanwhile half my department is leaving to teach in other countries which actually pay a living wage. the brain drain is real. i work 7am until 5pm with little break. inflation is killing me. now i have covid. strike now.
#535
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Edited by tears ()

#536
i read a local news article that said that quite a few schools were finding students who had simply stopped attending and when they went to the students' houses they would find the house empty and the family gone with no explanation and in the article there was no further attempt to explain this fairly alarming sounding thing apparently happening enmasse. anyway our education system is also in perpetual crisis mode because of covid staff shortages. fun atmosphere in the anglosphere right now
#537

lo posted:

i read a local news article that said that quite a few schools were finding students who had simply stopped attending and when they went to the students' houses they would find the house empty and the family gone with no explanation and in the article there was no further attempt to explain this fairly alarming sounding thing apparently happening enmasse



#538

tears posted:

i have covid fuck this country


i still have covid and have been off work for a week. i'm perma-nauseous and have on and off migraines. grotesque.

#539
migraines suck. feel better soon, buddy.
#540

lo posted:

i read a local news article that said that quite a few schools were finding students who had simply stopped attending and when they went to the students' houses they would find the house empty and the family gone with no explanation and in the article there was no further attempt to explain this fairly alarming sounding thing apparently happening enmasse. anyway our education system is also in perpetual crisis mode because of covid staff shortages. fun atmosphere in the anglosphere right now



i wonder if shit like this and the increasing ability of people to say no to the shittiest jobs (sorry i mean the high cost of labour) in the core are both a result of covid lockdowns and curfews just doing a complete reset on people who are "illegals" in any sense. people just forced to buckle down and then flee to somewhere they might have any useful status and cross their fingers, if they felt like covid was a real threat or if they felt like they had no choice for some other reason. anything seems possible

#541
double post?!
#542
I don’t know the size of the effect and I’d have to think hard about how to measure it…. but COVID happened at the same time as a record-setting gap emerged between wage growth and rent increases in the U.S., and those together forced a rapid shift in a lot of people’s outlook on multigenerational households and other forms of “consolidated” living, five adults to a two bedroom apartment and so on. Most people in the U.S. thought of that as the mark of various out-groups, first-generation immigrants, the semi-homeless, starving artists, etc. Even a lot of those who engaged in it felt that way and felt constant pressure to change their lives as soon as they could. But those sorts of living arrangements suddenly shed their social stigma for a lot of reasons related to COVID, and that clued a lot of people in to how much more sense they make for household economics.

In turn, that’s probably had some real effect on the usual pressure the bourgeoisie can apply in situations like today’s. Very recently, they could count on more young people going into much more personal debt and taking much more self-destructive measures in the long term just to have “their own place”, in that almost pathological way “your own place” is seen in the U.S. vs. most other countries, as a requirement for seeking financial independence instead of as a result of it. That is probably still going on a lot, you can’t just erase that sort of norm overnight, but COVID plus the rent/income gap might still have put a dent in that idea that will last for a while, just because people put it aside for a couple years and it saved them a lot of money and they were socially forgiven for it. It’s hard to forget that overnight too.

Combine that with the number of elderly workers, already living like that, who just near-silently died of COVID in the U.S., and the impact was probably significant. It also might be really difficult to quantify in that exact way, though. A big proportion of the senior-age workforce in the U.S. was already homeless or semi-homeless when the pandemic began, which means they’re both one of the highest-risk categories for death from COVID and among the most likely to die from it without COVID ever being recorded as cause of death.