#321
no one will even remember the lunatic's name by next week. he'll appear a few years from now in some story about a failed attempt to convict him for feeding inmates to sharks or something.
#322
https://www.salon.com/2013/07/07/%E2%80%9Cwhy_did_you_shoot_me_i_was_reading_a_book_the_new_warrior_cop_is_out_of_control/


Sal Culosi is dead because he bet on a football game — but it wasn’t a bookie or a loan shark who killed him. His local government killed him, ostensibly to protect him from his gambling habit.

Several months earlier at a local bar, Fairfax County, Virginia, detective David Baucum overheard the thirty-eight-year-old optometrist and some friends wagering on a college football game. “To Sal, betting a few bills on the Redskins was a stress reliever, done among friends,” a friend of Culosi’s told me shortly after his death. “None of us single, successful professionals ever thought that betting fifty bucks or so on the Virginia–Virginia Tech football game was a crime worthy of investigation.” Baucum apparently did. After overhearing the men wagering, Baucum befriended Culosi as a cover to begin investigating him. During the next several months, he talked Culosi into raising the stakes of what Culosi thought were just more fun wagers between friends to make watching sports more interesting. Eventually Culosi and Baucum bet more than $2,000 in a single day. Under Virginia law, that was enough for police to charge Culosi with running a gambling operation. And that’s when they brought in the SWAT team.

On the night of January 24, 2006, Baucum called Culosi and arranged a time to drop by to collect his winnings. When Culosi, barefoot and clad in a T-shirt and jeans, stepped out of his house to meet the man he thought was a friend, the SWAT team began to move in. Seconds later, Det. Deval Bullock, who had been on duty since 4:00 AM and hadn’t slept in seventeen hours, fired a bullet that pierced Culosi’s heart.

Sal Culosi’s last words were to Baucum, the cop he thought was a friend: “Dude, what are you doing?”
#323
fuck to america
#324
Good stuff

#325
Whoa



This article rules
#326
that lousianna sheriff needs to get in on the new hotness: hijacking a flawed-if-well-meaning liberal paradigm intended to stanch the worst aspects of the drug war in order to get unpaid labor from people who haven't even been convicted of anything https://www.revealnews.org/article/they-thought-they-were-going-to-rehab-they-ended-up-in-chicken-plants/

Standing in a tiny wood-paneled courtroom in rural Oklahoma in 2010, he faced one year in state prison. The judge had another plan.

“You need to learn a work ethic,” the judge told him. “I’m sending you to CAAIR.”

McGahey had heard of Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery. People called it “the Chicken Farm,” a rural retreat where defendants stayed for a year, got addiction treatment and learned to live more productive lives. Most were sent there by courts from across Oklahoma and neighboring states, part of the nationwide push to keep nonviolent offenders out of prison.

Aside from daily cans of Dr Pepper, McGahey wasn’t addicted to anything. The judge knew that. But the Chicken Farm sounded better than prison.

A few weeks later, McGahey stood in front of a speeding conveyor belt inside a frigid poultry plant, pulling guts and stray feathers from slaughtered chickens destined for major fast food restaurants and grocery stores.

There wasn’t much substance abuse treatment at CAAIR. It was mostly factory work for one of America’s top poultry companies. If McGahey got hurt or worked too slowly, his bosses threatened him with prison.

Medical notes later would say McGahey suffered a “severe crush injury.” The machine smashed his hand, breaking several bones and nearly severing a tendon in his wrist. When he finally yanked his wrist free, his hand was bent completely backward. The pain was so bad that he nearly fainted.

A nurse at the plant took one look at him and called CAAIR.

“The kid’s hand is mangled!” he recalled the nurse screaming into the phone. “He needs help!”

McGahey expected an ambulance. Instead, one of CAAIR’s top managers picked him up at the plant and drove him to the local hospital. Doctors took X-rays of McGahey’s hand, gave him a splint and ordered him not to work.

Back at CAAIR, he spent a sleepless night cradling his throbbing hand. He figured it would take months to heal and planned to rest. But CAAIR’s administrators would have none of it.

They called McGahey lazy and accused him of hurting himself on purpose to avoid working, former employees said. CAAIR told him that he had to go back to work – either at Simmons or around the campus until his hand healed, which wouldn’t count toward his one-year sentence.

Wilkerson said she doesn’t remember the specifics of McGahey’s case but acknowledged that CAAIR has given such ultimatums before.

“You can either work or you can go to prison,” McGahey remembered administrators telling him. “It’s up to you.”

He already had made up his mind.

“I’ll take prison over this place,” he said. “Anywhere is better than here.”

Men who were injured while at CAAIR rarely receive long-term help for their injuries. That’s because the program requires all men to sign a form stating that they are clients, not employees, and therefore have no right to workers’ comp. Reveal found that when men got hurt, CAAIR filed workers’ comp claims and kept the payouts. Injured men and their families never saw a dime.

#327
"McGahey expected an ambulance. Instead, one of CAAIR’s top managers picked him up at the plant and drove him to the local hospital. Doctors took X-rays of McGahey’s hand, gave him a splint and ordered him not to work."

this is a method companies use to avoid an OSHA recordable + investigation
#328
yeah in a way this is not a good candidate for this thread because between that and the worker's comp fraud there's a chance someone associated with this outfit might actually suffer consequences
#329
Not cop shoot man but something to get very mad about:
#330
this isn't a shooting, but some cops here are up on kidnapping charges for trying to stop a teen from having sex
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/98582692/trial-begins-for-senior-police-officers-charged-with-kidnapping-auckland-teen
#331
that is the most kiwi thing i have read in a long time
#332
crime: horney
punishment: transportation for life

the british empire babey!
#333
wow catching up on this thread is the most compressed depression-inducing garbage i have voluntarily crammed into my brain in a long time. where is the man shoot cop megathread
#334
its always in our hearts
#335
as someone who fancies himself a wordsmith, im a big fan of the creative euphemisms that cops use to minimize their brutal behavior. instead of leg-sweeping someone with hishands cuffed behind his back so he can only catch himself with his face, they "escorted him to the ground." i watched my colleague go back and forth with a cop in a hearing on whether he punched the client or "administered a closed-hand strike" to his face. i imagine they spend most of their training on this since i have to assume they show up to the academy already fully racist and violent
#336

TG posted:

i watched my colleague go back and forth with a cop in a hearing on whether he punched the client or "administered a closed-hand strike" to his face.



did your colleague get anywhere with that? arguing the shit out of dirty cops does make lawyering sound a bit more attractive

#337
i dont know if it ultimately affected the outcome of the hearing (we lose almost all legal issues we litigate) but it made enough of an impression on the judge that i mentioned it in passing recently (it happened two years ago) and he remembered it. i think he just thought it was funny rather than showed the cop to be a total piece of shit, though

i do think it likely undermined the cop's credibility somewhat. because judges are the trier of fact in most legal hearings short of jury trial, they decide whether or not a witness is credible. usually they just use boiler plate language (i heard testimony from officer douchebag, who testified credibly and with merit) but they can technically rule that a witness is incredible as a matter of law, finding that the testimony is so flagrantly false that nothing the witness says can be trusted. its one of my main career goals to get a judge to find a cop incredible as a matter of law
#338

lo posted:

this isn't a shooting, but some cops here are up on kidnapping charges for trying to stop a teen from having sex
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/98582692/trial-begins-for-senior-police-officers-charged-with-kidnapping-auckland-teen



torn between my hate for cops and my hate for sex-havers

#339

TG posted:

as someone who fancies himself a wordsmith, im a big fan of the creative euphemisms that cops use to minimize their brutal behavior.


of all these euphemisms, my favourite (by which i mean the one most likely to drive me to another massive breakdown one day after i see it one too many times) has got to be "officer-involved shooting". it feels like something that only really rose to prominence in the last decade. it is a specifically american term, i never hear it outside reporting on yank incidents, though i am probably jinxing it by saying that and a breakdown will be just round the corner when i hear it in local strayan news.

i did a quick google just now to try and work out when it started but all i found was a guy who did a book on "bureaucratic language" who seems to be inspired by orwell (bleugh!!) and a law professor calling for the death of the phrase with insightful wit:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/craig-martin/time-to-kill-the-term-off_b_7428072.html posted:

There was a shooting, the police were involved, and someone died, but the relationship among these concepts is blurred, if not entirely disconnected. But that too is false. The police were not “involved” and the relationship is not uncertain - on the contrary, they did the shooting, they were the actors who did the killing, they were the cause of the violent and untimely death. The relationship and the direction of causation are crystal clear. If a dog bites a child, we would not describe the incident as a “dog involved biting”, and we would find it odd to hear it stated this way. We would simply say that a dog bit a child, and would expect to hear it reported that way.

#340

TG posted:

but they can technically rule that a witness is incredible as a matter of law, finding that the testimony is so flagrantly false that nothing the witness says can be trusted. its one of my main career goals to get a judge to find a cop incredible as a matter of law

ha thats pretty cool. i got called up for jury duty and they told me about the case and i said "well, i don't trust the testimony of police" and they did a good job not rolling their eyes. i was being honest though, if you're going to have a bunch of cops "tell us what happened" you might as well flip an expensive coin of some sort and use the even chance that it might land with either side facing up to determine the trial outcome

#341
my proudest jury duty moment was nullifying a technically valid charge by convincing enough grand jurors that it was based on a bullshit statute designed for charge-stacking
#342

Constantignoble posted:

my proudest jury duty moment was nullifying a technically valid charge by convincing enough grand jurors that it was based on a bullshit statute designed for charge-stacking


my dude

#343
I looked at conviction rates and resolved to stealth it and vote not guilty
#344
No matter how racist you are before becoming a police officer, it always makes you even more racist. There are studies backing this up
#345
a
#346
#347

swampman posted:

TG posted:

but they can technically rule that a witness is incredible as a matter of law, finding that the testimony is so flagrantly false that nothing the witness says can be trusted. its one of my main career goals to get a judge to find a cop incredible as a matter of law

ha thats pretty cool. i got called up for jury duty and they told me about the case and i said "well, i don't trust the testimony of police" and they did a good job not rolling their eyes. i was being honest though, if you're going to have a bunch of cops "tell us what happened" you might as well flip an expensive coin of some sort and use the even chance that it might land with either side facing up to determine the trial outcome



your honesty was appreciated im sure but if you can ever afford to be off work for the duration of a trial and want to help a brother (more likely than not) out, the key to getting on a jury is to keep your head down and act as nondescript as possible. there are always a few jurors who both sides dont kick because they know next to nothing about them. then once you get in the jury room you can vote not guilty and dig your heels in until either everyone else capitulates or the judge declares a mistrial. as the saying goes, justice delayed is justice served. this is a joke, but there are several strategic reasons that a mistrial is a good thing for the defendant

i desperately want to get on a jury, if only to see what the dynamic is like in the jury room. how do they pick a foreperson (in my experience it is always the oldest white male, at least up to around 70)? do they even bother reading the legal instructions that the judge gives them? can a strong personality just overcome everyone else and make whatever they want happen? unfortunately i am statutorily barred from criminal jury service, at least until i stop doing this job. even then, no lawyer wants a lawyer on their jury unless its a complex case with nuanced legal issues

also, its pretty nice practicing in a town with a history of municipal corruption because even your average middle class white person doesnt trust the police or prosecutors

#348

Constantignoble posted:

my proudest jury duty moment was nullifying a technically valid charge by convincing enough grand jurors that it was based on a bullshit statute designed for charge-stacking



not all heroes wear capes (unless you wore a cape to jury duty, but something tells me they wouldnt have let that fly)

#349

TG posted:

your honesty was appreciated im sure but if you can ever afford to be off work for the duration of a trial and want to help a brother (more likely than not) out, the key to getting on a jury is to keep your head down and act as nondescript as possible. there are always a few jurors who both sides dont kick because they know next to nothing about them. then once you get in the jury room you can vote not guilty and dig your heels in until either everyone else capitulates or the judge declares a mistrial. as the saying goes, justice delayed is justice served. this is a joke, but there are several strategic reasons that a mistrial is a good thing for the defendant



this is a cool tip, I'm going to note this in case I ever get jury duty

#350

Caesura109 posted:

Not cop shoot man but something to get very mad about:



This is cop shoot kid which is worse. Tasers are not "non-lethal"

#351
Fuck remember that video where the cops strapped that kid down and tased him 40 times while restrained
#352
my jury duty was bad
#353

Caesura109 posted:

Fuck remember that video where the cops strapped that kid down and tased him 40 times while restrained


ah, that one

#354
i love this sort of shit

“At this point the suspected shooter is deceased by law enforcement bullets,” Tehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston told reporters.

#355
hahahaha
#356

aerdil posted:

“At this point the suspected shooter is deceased by law enforcement bullets,” Tehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston told reporters.



i have got to get me one of these

#357
This may be the funniest shit ever to happen
http://www.fox2detroit.com/news/local-news/detroit-police-officers-fight-each-other-in-undercover-op-gone-wrong

Sources say it started when two special ops officers from the 12th Precinct were operating a "push off" on Andover near Seven Mile. That is when two undercover officers pretend to be dope dealers, waiting for eager customers to approach, and then arrest potential buyers and seize their vehicles.

But this time, instead of customers, special ops officers from the 11th Precinct showed up. Not realizing they were fellow officers, they ordered the other undercover officers to the ground.

FOX 2 is told the rest of the special ops team from the 12th Precinct showed up, and officers began raiding a house in the 19300 block of Andover. But instead of fighting crime, officers from both precincts began fighting with each other.

Sources say guns were drawn and punches were thrown while the homeowner stood and watched.

"You've gotta have to have more communication, I guess," said the resident. "I don't understand what happened about that - communicate."

FOX 2 is told one of the units had body camera video that detailed the entire incident. That is now part of the internal investigation and we are working to get our hands on it.

We're told top brass doesn't plan to comment on this until next week.

#358
Officer-involved Hooting (and Hollering)
#359
#360
Leo Lech is suing the police in Greenwood, Colorado for storming his house with a 50-person SWAT team because they mistakenly believed that a man who ran into his house (whom Lech didn't know) had shoplifted a shirt and two belts from Walmart; the police engaged in a 19-hour standoff that led to the near-total destruction of Lech's house due to the use of "calculated destruction," a tactic through which explosives are detonated through the house, room by room, to isolate the suspect.

Lech was given $5000 in compensation.

According to a report from the Denver Post, officers claimed that when they entered the home, “Seacat, who was on an upper floor, fired four or five shots through the floor at officers below.” Police decided to respond to one man barricaded in a home and armed with a handgun by employing 50 SWAT officers and a host of expensive technology, destroying the majority of the home, before they found their suspect in a bathroom and arrested him. The National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) described the strategy used by the SWAT officers as “calculated destruction,” in which they launched explosives throughout the house, room-by-room, in order to isolate Seacat.