#3201

#3202


I don't know why Joanna Newsom did an oi band track, but it's apparently about wealth redistribution?
#3203
memorial day today...

#3204
#3205
Happy Pride



Edited by trakfactri ()

#3206
thirdform/BigGlitch1's top 100
#3207
#3208
i did something stupid ive wanted to do for years
https://clyp.it/b4gtslf3
#3209
#3210
#3211
#3212
#3213
#3214
#3215
#3216
#3217
incredible:


more info and rar from here: https://music-republic-world-traditional.blogspot.com/ OR https://www.discogs.com/Various-Valiha-Madagascar/release/6674878

This LP was ORTF/Ocora’s first release of Malagasy music “that bears witness to the presence of Indonesian, African, European, Islamic and Indian cultural influences,” emphasized Charles Duvelle (1937-2017) in the liner notes.

The album showcases the tubular valiha zither found throughout the island of Madagascar off of Africa’s southeastern coast. This 10- to 20-string instrument, originating from Indonesia, was initially played to invoke the ancestors, and was subsequently adopted by many ethnic groups, including the central-highland Merina aristocracy in the 19th century. The valiha comes in many different materials (bamboo, wood, raffia, metal, bamboo fiber strings, metal strings), shapes (tubular, rectangular) and sizes (60 cm-to-130 cm/24 in-50 in), and players sometimes use resonators to amplify its mellifluous sound. Either played as a lead instrument or used as a drone (A6-A7), valiha music runs the gamut from trance music to virtuoso playing and light music.

Side A features the valiha played by the Merina people from the central highlands (A1-A3), the Sakalava people from the western and northwest coastal regions (A4-A5), the Bara people from the southern highlands (here freeing someone possessed by a spirit entity) (A6), the Antanosy people from the west (A7), and the Betsimisaraka people from the northwestern coast (A8).

Side B presents more urban styles performed by skilled musicians that combine traditional Malagasy music with western harmonies. Artists include Rakotozafy (B1-B2), Sylvestre Randa-fison (B3-B5), and Maurice Halison (B6-B9), all of whom earned fame nationwide through National Radio broadcasts.

#3218
totally unrelated:


#3219
pop punk
#3220
hang my head, drown my fear
til you all just disappear

#3221
let's do it
wave bye
this time
you die
if not
quite soon
maybe by
this afternoon



#3222
#3223

jansenist_drugstore posted:



#3224
https://saintabdullah-boomarmnation.bandcamp.com/
#3225
#3226
that's a cool video
#3227
running up that hill covers are my gender preference, for the record
#3228
yeah that's a great video. shame it's for such a pointless cover. i can never understand why someone would think a song like that needs their boring karaoke treatment
#3229
>:(
#3230
sorry i don't know who she is and maybe her fans would prefer to listen to that version but all i can think is there is no reason to listen to it when the original exists. if you're gonna cover a stone cold classic like that you really have to put a new spin on it or people who never heard your stuff before will just think "well she's no kate bush"
#3231
it's not an awful cover and i'm sorry to sound harsh.
#3232
funny this should come up as the song Running Up That Hill was written by me, Daddyholes.
#3233
#3234
#3235
#3236
#3237

#3238

cars posted:


#3239

cars posted:


#3240
breakcore never dies