#1
EVERY MORNING I WAKE UP AND OPEN PALM SLAM AN APP OPEN. IT'S PIMSLEUR AND RIGHT THEN AND THERE I START DOING THE MOVES ALONGSIDE WITH THE MAIN CHARACTER, EL SENOR JUAN. I ROLL EVERY R AND I ROLL EVERY R HARD. MAKIN WHOOSHING SOUNDS WHEN I CORRECTLY USE ESTAR VS SER TENSES OR EVEN WHEN I MESS UP TECHNIQUE. NOT MANY CAN SAY THEY ESCAPED MONOLINGUALISM. I CAN. I SAY IT AND I SAY IT OUTLOUD EVERYDAY TO PEOPLE IN MY COLLEGE CLASS AND ALL THEY DO IS PROVE PEOPLE IN COLLEGE CLASS CAN STILL BE IMMATURE JEKRS. AND IVE LEARNED ALL THE LINES AND IVE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE MYSELF AND MY APARTMENT LESS LONELY BY SHOUTING EM ALL. 2 HOURS INCLUDING WIND DOWN EVERY MORNIng
#2
Anyway I'm learning Spanish and I'm like halfway to Peggy Hill. I've been trying out a bunch of different apps and methods and I'm kinda digging LingQ the most out of them, its basically a combination of SRS (spaced repetition software) with a heavy focus on reading/listening. I'm using Pimsleur to encourage me to practice speaking as well.

Other ones I think are pretty good: Babbel is less gamey but very clean to use. Anki is really solid as a free SRS tool and there's tons of decks available, but this might be better to use as a maintenance tool. Duolingo is very gamey and definitely the most fun but missing the SRS functions and features

My plan is that once I have some very baseline competence and a bigger vocabulary I will be doing more conversational practice with real people instead of imaginary ones
#3
I learned Japanese so I can read about New Left Trots murdering each other for no reason. It's very useful.
#4
I usually read as much content as I can and put unknown words into an Anki deck. My reading comprehension skyrockets so long as I stick to doing the flashcards. I sometimes wonder if the best way to learn a language is to just sit down and translate a book, like how all our favorite polymath thinkers used to do 200 years ago. Marx could read nearly every European language.

"Marx could read all European languages and write in three: German, French and English, to the admiration of language experts. He liked to repeat the saying: “A foreign language is a weapon in the struggle of life.”

-Paul Lafargue
#5
yeah whatever if i lived during a time when there wasn't any internet or tv shows i'd probably have written four volumes in economics in ten different languages too
#6
There's an innocuous little app called HelloChinese that finally got me over the first hump of Mandarin, if anyone is interested in that. I tried a bunch of shit over years and maybe it wasn't that app that unlocked something, maybe it was just brute force, but I liked it anyway. You can turn off pinyin, which I recommend because then you're just confronted with the raw problem of "well you better learn how to recognize these fucking things, gwailo".

Then I found a tutor on a website called tutoroo and i was really shocked how low the going rate is for language tutors, it was cheaper than any of the classes i could find. We became friends and now I know some Mandarin.

The most important thing I was told was to stop freaking out about tones. Just say the words and maybe you fuck up the tones sometimes but context will save you 99% of the time, and if you ever learn enough so that you're saying sentences that are complex enough that they actually could be interpreted multiple ways depending on your tones, you'll be able to deal with it then.

It's been a really long time and I'm just about to finish HSK 3, which is just barely enough to say basic things about daily life, but I can translate things with the help of a dictionary (Pleco is the best dictionary app ever but it gets real expensive if you buy the add ons) and I'm gonna keep going.
#7
I too am learning Mandarin via HelloChinese + Anki flashcards + Pleco and I would recommend each one thus far. I also recently started using Perapera, a “popup dictionary” browser extension that allows you to instantly look up definitions of characters by hovering over the text. Very helpful for reading practice (and still works great despite having lost developer support long ago).
#8
the best part about learning language is that you are transported back to preverbal infancy, thereby free to rewrite all of your smashed down shame in a new dialect however you please. once had a piss fetish? change it to feet. thought you were afraid of the dark? now you're afraid of the sun. your old friends will be impressed by your seemingly monstrous self-overhaul and your new friends will only know you as an infant, even if you get halfway decent with whatever new language you speak. wins all around.
#9

str_el_boi posted:

I too am learning Mandarin via HelloChinese + Anki flashcards + Pleco and I would recommend each one thus far. I also recently started using Perapera, a “popup dictionary” browser extension that allows you to instantly look up definitions of characters by hovering over the text. Very helpful for reading practice (and still works great despite having lost developer support long ago).


oh yeah I use LiuChan for that, same thing. extremely helpful and this one still has dev support. you can even make it look like Pleco if you want

#10
I speak French conversationally from doing French Immersion education, which also conveniently teaches you basic mathematics in French which has left me a lifelong math simpleton.
I'm also using Human Japanese because people said it was good. It's pretty decent so far. I'm trying to read The Woman In The Dunes entirely in Japanese by the end of the year or I will ceremonially kill myself with a shortsword.
#11

wheatdevil posted:

I'm also using Human Japanese because people said it was good.


I'm learning Dog Japanese, limited applicability but it's much easier.

#12

shriekingviolet posted:

I'm learning Dog Japanese, limited applicability but it's much easier.



It's harder than I expected though, I bit off more than I could chew

#13
finally a post that lives up to my avatar
#14
I'm learning Chinese too. It's a long, steep road but I feel a very challenging goal gives my life a stabilizing long-term structure, which is pleasant.

I came to a valuable realization today after my umpteenth foray into the cringy blogs and slimy reddit threads that constitute the 'language learning' corner of the internet. That corner is really a sub-sub-corner of the liberal self-help edifice. Just as every douchebag with a million dollars or ten million subscribers wants to sell you their 'rags-to-riches' technique, every chump who learns a language above an intermediate level thinks it is his prerogative to tell you how he did it and to expound his pet linguistic theories. Of course, these blogs have their place; they can be useful as bibliographies and 'tips and trix' compendiums. The occasional boons are set in the same ambient field as the rest of the internet, though. Techno-fetishism and the subjectivity of 'content consumers' are taken for granted. Most preachers purport to be relaying 'neuroscience' and other such unreplicatable science fads. One of the most psychotic methods I have come across, replete with a time-cube CSS is All Japanese All The Time, which encourages you to spend every waking hour passively absorbing anime and other Japanese content in tandem with Anki (I confess to using Anki too, but I am still not 100% convinced it is much more than a fad). I have equal parts admiration and disgust for the lunatics of AJATT. At their best , they take the firehose of content channel a small portion of it to do useful work. At their worst, they are wallowing in entertainment jelly.

Contrast this with the biographies of Marx and Lenin. Admittedly, neither learned any language outside of the proto-euro-indo branch, but studying harder languages entails a difference of quantity, not quality -- what I say still applies. Marx and Lenin had excellent concentration and patience from long experience reading and writing in their native languages. That experience transferred well to their studies of other languages. Both would readily chat with old and new acquaintances in a variety of languages, Lenin even specifically going with his wife to practice English in London parks and squares. Marx got his tips and tricks from Hegel, who apparently advocated memorizing verses of poetry in languages you DIDN't read as a sort of memory-strengthening hack. Maybe it is not possible for us to study like the intellectuals in the old style, but I'm going to try.

I'm writing this for my fellow students who have the same obsessive tendency to turn to the internet as an oracle, following it's advice, getting burned, forgetting, and coming back for more. At the end of the day, what really counts is hard work and dedication, which, ironically, you will also find as a tenet in every one of the methods I criticize. What you won't find, though, is any sense of historical context or seriousness of thought like we do on the rhiz'. Before the age of mechanical reproduction and the complete desiccation of the oral tradition, lots of people where able to recite stories, songs, plays and religious texts verbatim. People managed to be polyglots before Anki and streaming video, and I see no evidence that the advent of those two things has caused any great advance.

If, like me, you must spend equal time studying and fiddling with techno-methodology, at least try and counter-balance the trend with some old-school methods.
#15
please excuse me if my posting style is tedious and earnest, I have been reading 'The Magic Mountain'
#16

Belphegor posted:

Lenin



To learn English he put an ad in the newspaper for an english teacher while he was in London. Michael Collins answered and Lenin later learned English with an Irish accent.

#17
come out ye black hundreds
#18
https://www.marxists.org/archive/gramsci/prison_notebooks/problems/education.htm

Just read Gramsci on education. He does a good job of explaining the former 'educational principle' of Latin and Greek studies, and why it was actually good. Many of the problems he foresees with educational modernization and expansion are still with us. As a student, I feel I have to play catch-up with the shoddy study habits I learned in lax, 'creative' schooling.
#19

Belphegor posted:

Just read Gramsci on education. He does a good job of explaining the former 'educational principle' of Latin and Greek studies, and why it was actually good. Many of the problems he foresees with educational modernization and expansion are still with us. As a student, I feel I have to play catch-up with the shoddy study habits I learned in lax, 'creative' schooling.


learning latin is hard labor. learning latin is hard labor. learing latin is hard labor. learning latin is hard labor.

#20
Liberalism is such a powerful ideology that it can turn learning another language into a commodified eat pray love journey of self-discovery
#21
practicing russian by playing dota 2 and getting yelled at by russian teenagers
#22
sometimes i've thought about learning khmer just to read pol pot stuff but that's a bit too psycho even for me(also i don't know where i would find a khmer tutor except maybe by asking random cambodian people if they have any idea). if there was also some insane high brow novels in khmer i'd probably do it though
#23

lo posted:

sometimes i've thought about learning khmer just to read pol pot stuff but that's a bit too psycho even for me(also i don't know where i would find a khmer tutor except maybe by asking random cambodian people if they have any idea). if there was also some insane high brow novels in khmer i'd probably do it though



sounds like your god given purpose is to write a high brow novel in khmer

#24
name it "the society without spectacles"
#25

sovnarkoman posted:

name it "the society without spectacles"


lmao

#26

sovnarkoman posted:

name it "the society without spectacles"


#27
lol
#28
cool, a local instructor who has 1-on-1 online lessons on "Spoken Lebanese" and kind of looks like cliff clavin. I wonder if he's got any material on his website

well maybe he's got some demo lessons on his youtube channel
#29

Belphegor posted:

Maybe it is not possible for us to study like the intellectuals in the old style, but I'm going to try.


Belphegor posted:

I have been reading 'The Magic Mountain'



have begun translating kafka into english and will then translate it back into german. thought about both of these posts as well as joachim ziemmsen hopelessly translating russian texts while waiting to die.

i'm hoping that this in tandem with day-to-day practicing lodges german firmly into my skull and will report back on successes and ultimately its failures