#1
#2


he fat.
#3
its badass that his cadence now reads like a william gaddis parody
#4
NEWYEAR +
#5


get on it rhizzone north koreafans
#6
north korean: i do not understand. they think this regime is food-starved? haha. *floats away on Kim brand antigravity belt*
#7
baron, we need you now more than ever, google prince dipendra
#8
nuclear brinkmanship has always been a dickwaving exercise for the yanks, gotta hand it to trump for spelling it out
#9
#10
Thabk god for fact checkers, true patriots
#11
there s a button
#12
fact check: Trump has one of those red buttons from the checkout line at staples and after he hammers it and the prerecorded voice says "that was easy" the missileers have been instructed to incinerate all Koreans.
#13
They tricked him with a fake button that's one of those shocking pranks toy things and the only reason he hasnt nuked the Korean people is cuz hes too scared to otuch red buttons now
#14
welcome to The Resistance™, Steve Bannon!
#15


the democrats' policy of not worrying about holding congress as long as they always have the presidency is really paying off big
#16
i'VE GOT THE BIGGEST CAPS LOCK BUTTON, AND IT WORKS
#17
CAPS TEST
#18
I LIKE BIG BUTT(ON)S
#19
#20
reading the first bit of fire and fury and the more plausible part is the democratic party lost to a bunch of snakes who won on accident
#21
iam also reading extracts from the book "fire and fury" and everything in this book is true. i never want this ride to end
#22
i'm reading the new trump tell-all and lol at people who think any fiction could capture his cadence so flawlessly
#23
The president’s immediate official business, however, was to make nice with the CIA.

On Saturday, January 21, in an event organized by Kushner, the president, in his first presidential act, paid a call on Langley to, in Bannon’s hopeful description, “play some politics.” In carefully prepared remarks in his first act as president, he would lay some of the famous Trump flattery on the CIA and the rest of the sprawling, and leaking, U.S. intelligence world.

Not taking off his dark overcoat, lending him quite a hulking gangster look, pacing in front of the CIA’s wall of stars for its fallen agents, in front of a crowd of about three hundred agency personnel and a group of White House staffers, and, suddenly, in a mood of sleepless cockiness and pleasure at having a captive crowd, the new president, disregarding his text, launched into what we could confidently call some of the most peculiar remarks ever delivered by an American president.

“I know a lot about West Point, I’m a person who very strongly believes in academics. Every time I say I had an uncle who was a great professor at MIT for 35 years, who did a fantastic job in so many ways academically—he was an academic genius—and then they say, Is Donald Trump an intellectual? Trust me, I’m like a smart person.”

Which was all somehow by way of praise for the new, soon-to-be-confirmed CIA director, Mike Pompeo, who had attended West Point and who Trump had brought with him to stand in the crowd—and who now found himself as bewildered as everyone else.

“You know when I was young. Of course I feel young—I feel like I was 30 . . . 35 . . . 39 . . . . Somebody said, Are you young? I said, I think I’m young. I was stopping in the final months of the campaign, four stops, five stops, seven stops—speeches, speeches in front of twenty-five, thirty thousand people . . . fifteen, nineteen thousand. I feel young—I think we’re all so young. When I was young we were always winning things in this country. We’d win with trade, we’d win with wars—at a certain age I remembering hearing from one of my instructors, the United States has never lost a war. And then, after that, it’s like we haven’t won anything. You know the old expression, to the victor belongs the spoils? You remember I always say, keep the oil.”

“Who should keep the oil?” asked a bewildered CIA employee, leaning over to a colleague in the back of the room.

“I wasn’t a fan of Iraq, I didn’t want to go into Iraq. But I will tell you when we were in we got out wrong and I always said in addition to that keep the oil. Now I said it for economic reasons, but if you think about it, Mike”—he called out across the room, addressing the soon-to-be director—“if we kept the oil we wouldn’t have ISIS because that’s where they made their money in the first place, so that’s why we should have kept the oil. But okay—maybe you’ll have another chance—but the fact is we should have kept the oil.”

The president paused and smiled with evident satisfaction.

“The reason you are my first stop, as you know I have a running war with the media, they are among the most dishonest human beings on earth, and they sort of made it sound like I had a feud with the intelligence community and I just want to let you know the reason you’re the number one stop is exactly the opposite, exactly, and they understand that. I was explaining about the numbers. We did, we did a thing yesterday at the speech. Did everybody like the speech? You had to like it. But we had a massive field of people. You saw them. Packed. I get up this morning, I turn on one of the networks, and they show an empty field and I say, Wait a minute, I made a speech. I looked out—the field was—it looked like a million, million and half people. They showed a field where there were practically nobody standing there. And they said Donald Trump did not draw well and I said it was almost raining, the rain should have scared them away, but God looked down and said we’re not going to let it rain on your speech and in fact when I first started I said, Oooh no, first line I got hit by a couple of drops, and I said, Oh this is too bad, but we’ll go right through it, the truth is it stopped immediately. . . .”

“No, it didn’t,” one of the staffers traveling with him said reflexively, then catching herself and, with a worried look, glancing around to see if she had been overheard.

“. . . and then it became really sunny and I walked off and it poured right after I left. It poured but we have something amazing because—honestly it looked like a million, million and a half people, whatever it was it was, but it went all the way back to the Washington Monument and by mistake I get this network and it showed an empty field and it said we drew two hundred fifty thousand people. Now that’s not bad, but it’s a lie. . . . And we had another one yesterday which was interesting. In the Oval Office there’s a beautiful statue of Dr. Martin Luther King and I also happen to like Churchill—Winston Churchill—I think most of us like Churchill, doesn’t come from our country but had a lot to do with it, helped us, real ally, and as you know the Churchill statue was taken out. . . . So a reporter for Time magazine and I have been on the cover like fourteen or fifteen times. I think I have the all-time record in the history of Time magazine. Like if Tom Brady is on the cover it’s one time because he won the Super Bowl or something. I’ve been on fifteen times this year. I don’t think, Mike, that’s a record that can ever be broken, do you agree with that . . . . What do you think?”

“No,” said Pompeo in a stricken voice.

“But I will say that they said it was very interesting that ‘Donald Trump took down the bust, the statue, of Dr. Martin Luther King,’ and it was right there, there was a cameraman that was in front of it. So Zeke . . . Zeke . . . from Time magazine . . . writes a story that I took it down. I would never do that. I have great respect for Dr. Martin Luther King. But this is how dishonest the media is. Now big story, but the retraction was like this”—he indicated ever-so-small with his fingers. “Is it a line or do they even bother putting it in? I only like to say I love honesty, I like honest reporting. I will tell you, final time, although I will say it when you let in your thousands of other people who have been trying to come in, because I am coming back, we may have to get you a larger room, we may have to get you a larger room and maybe, maybe, it will be built by somebody that knows how to build and we won’t have columns. You understand that? We get rid of the columns, but you know I just wanted to say that I love you, I respect you, there’s nobody I respect more. You do a fantastic job and we’re going to start winning again, and you’re going to be leading the charge, so thank you all very much.”

In a continuing sign of Trump’s Rashomon effect—his speeches inspiring joy or horror—witnesses would describe his reception at the CIA as either a Beatles-like emotional outpouring or a response so confounded and appalled that, in the seconds after he finished, you could hear a pin drop.
#24
Priebus demonstrated no ability to keep Trump from talking to anyone who wanted his ear. The president-elect enjoyed being courted. On December 14, a high-level delegation from Silicon Valley came to Trump Tower to meet him. Later that afternoon, according to a source privy to details of the conversation, Trump called Rupert Murdoch, who asked him how the meeting had gone.

“Oh, great, just great,” said Trump. “These guys really need my help. Obama was not very favorable to them, too much regulation. This is really an opportunity for me to help them.”

“Donald,” said Murdoch, “for eight years these guys had Obama in their pocket. They practically ran the administration. They don’t need your help.”

“Take this H-1B visa issue. They really need these H-1B visas.”

Murdoch suggested that taking a liberal approach to H-1B visas, which open America’s doors to select immigrants, might be hard to square with his promises to build a wall and close the borders. But Trump seemed unconcerned, assuring Murdoch, “We’ll figure it out.”

“What a fucking idiot,” said Murdoch, shrugging, as he got off the phone.
#25

le_nelson_mandela_face posted:

i'm reading the new trump tell-all and lol at people who think any fiction could capture his cadence so flawlessly


his cadence fascinates me because its so much more exaggerated than how he used to talk. like the liberal stuff about his being mentally ill is pretty misplaced i think but maybe he does have dementia or something

#26
goat can you get a copy of the book into the secret pdf forum? no way im gonna buy it but for all his flaws, trumps words are some of the most hilarious things ever spoken

although i imagine most of it will be posted by liberals on twitter so maybe thats unnecessary
#27
is it still called dementia when it's the direct result of many years of drug abuse
#28

Petrol posted:

is it still called dementia when it's the direct result of many years of drug abuse



then its called ur posting

#29
|Goon Project| Let's Read Art of the Deal
#30

TG posted:

goat can you get a copy of the book into the secret pdf forum? no way im gonna buy it but for all his flaws, trumps words are some of the most hilarious things ever spoken

although i imagine most of it will be posted by liberals on twitter so maybe thats unnecessary



epub https://we.tl/XWyS8QiitO

#31

tears posted:

“What a fucking idiot,” said Murdoch, shrugging, as he unsheathed his katana.


#32


(btw.. the pee tape is real)
#33
#34
if donald trump weighs 239 pounds he contains a dangerous amount of helium
#35
lol
#36
my approach that the president is a wrestling heel continues to be correct as he has a fictional billed weight
#37
elizabeth bruenig stole the take i hadnt written yet about how trump's appeal is that he is the freest man in the world. while it is strange to say this about a man so stupid and fat, he is in a sense the ubermensch, in that he is beyond good and evil - not in a metaphysical sense, but in the fact that these things cannot touch him. he's immune to shaming and judgment, he can lie and sin without consequence, in a very real way was above the law even before he was the president. this is extremely attractive to people who deeply resent anyone who tells them that they shouldn't do whatever they want, from underpaying their workers to being openly racist
#38
i wrote something once years ago about how projecting that image, of proudly not knowing the "right" thing to do in any and every given public situation and doing something anyway with zero consequences, replaced bourgeois propriety (knowing the right fork to pick up, etc.) as preferred bourgeois class signaling in the West right around the beginning of the 21st century, and how that had led to a decline in interest in things like cotillion classes for the petit-bourgeois since the providers could no longer believably present what they taught as a route to class mobility. My first example was Paris Hilton, who of course was a friend of Ivanka's from a young age and started her modeling career under Trump Management
#39

cars posted:

i wrote something once years ago about how projecting that image, of proudly not knowing the "right" thing to do in any and every given public situation and doing something anyway with zero consequences, replaced bourgeois propriety (knowing the right fork to pick up, etc.) as preferred bourgeois class signaling in the West right around the beginning of the 21st century, and how that had led to a decline in interest in things like cotillion classes for the petit-bourgeois since the providers could no longer believably present what they taught as a route to class mobility. My first example was Paris Hilton, who of course was a friend of Ivanka's from a young age and started her modeling career under Trump Management



yeah this is an excellent point, but i would say it's more a way to signal power within the bourgoisie itself. the graspers and the climbers still learn the right manners, go to the right schools, learn about champagne, dress up and go to the society parties, etc. despite their wealth, they're in a position where their reputation still matters, possibly to the continuation of their wealth, but at least to their social standing. the millionaires. but then you have those who do not need to do any of that shit. from Steve Jobs' wearing a sweater and jeans to Trump's bloated crassness, they are signaling that they are so wealthy that they are beyond the rules of high society, which of course high society resents (He Is Breaching Our Norms)

#40


game recognize game