#9801
got a notice of eviction two days ago, what have you all done for the revolution
#9802
that sucks, got any support networks? if there's any IWW presence near you they can try and help you out, or if you're lucky enough to have a decent communist party near you. i mean, i dunno your specific situation, you might want to not deal with all that bs and just leave, but if you were feeling like fighting it..
#9803
thx - i reached out to the nw justice project and got a legal org recommendation, they should be calling me today, although now that eviction moratoriums have ended they are getting like 4x the calls

but yeah, I just want to get away from this asshole, just don't want to have to do it in one week. it'll stretch me financially but won't break me.
#9804
if you're in the seattle-tacoma area and can help me move since i'm facing an eviction it would be much appreciated

Edited by karphead ()

#9805
i'll be on the discord more often over the next few days if you want to reach me that way, thx
#9806
i'm not so far, just up in canada near vancouver, and my last job was as a mover....unfortunately, my passport is long expired. sorry.
#9807
hell, if my passport wasn't expired i'd probably just go to klanada
#9808
one thing the dont tell you about teaching is that teaching is like war, in that it is about strategy and tactics and friction and logistics. never thought i would be saying that i learned more about teaching from clauzwitz and mao that from those all those teaching manuals

---

Next, let us consider war. If those who lead a war lack experience of war, then at the initial stage they will not understand the profound laws pertaining to the directing of a specific war (such as our Agrarian Revolutionary War of the past decade). At the initial stage they will merely experience a good deal of fighting and, what is more, suffer many defeats. But this experience (the experience of battles won and especially of battles lost) enables them to comprehend the inner thread of the whole war, namely, the laws of that specific war, to understand its strategy and tactics, and consequently to direct the war with confidence. If, at such a moment, the command is turned over to an inexperienced person, then he too will have to suffer a number of defeats (gain experience) before he can comprehend the true laws of the war.

"I am not sure I can handle it." We often hear this remark when a comrade hesitates to accept an assignment. Why is he unsure of himself? Because he has no systematic understanding of the content and circumstances of the assignment, or because he has had little or no contact with such work, and so the laws governing it are beyond him. After a detailed analysis of the nature and circumstances of the assignment, he will feel more sure of himself and do it willingly. If he spends some time at the job and gains experience and if he is a person who is willing to look into matters with an open mind and not one who approaches problems subjectively, one-sidedly and superficially, then he can draw conclusions for himself as to how to go about the job and do it with much more courage. Only those who are subjective, one-sided and superficial in their approach to problems will smugly issue orders or directives the moment they arrive on the scene, without considering the circumstances, without viewing things in their totality (their history and their present state as a whole) and without getting to the essence of things (their nature and the internal relations between one thing and another). Such people are bound to trip and fall.

Thus it can be seen that the first step in the process of cognition is contact with the objects of the external world; this belongs to the stage of perception. The second step is to synthesize the data of perception by arranging and reconstructing them; this belongs to the stage of conception, judgement and inference. It is only when the data of perception are very rich (not fragmentary) and correspond to reality (are not illusory) that they can be the basis for forming correct concepts and theories.

---

Further, every war is rich in particular facts; while, at the same time, each is an unexplored sea, full of rocks, which the general may have a suspicion of, but which he has never seen with his eye, and round which, moreover, he must steer in the night. If a contrary wind also springs up, that is, if any great accidental event declares itself adverse to him, then the most consummate skill, presence of mind and energy, are required; whilst to those who only look on from a distance, all seems to proceed with the utmost ease. The knowledge of this friction is a chief part of that so often talked of, experience in war, which is required in a good general. Certainly, he is not the best general in whose mind it assumes the greatest dimensions, who is the most overawed by it (this includes that class of over-anxious generals, of whom there are so many amongst the experienced); but a general must be aware of it that he may overcome it, where that is possible; and that he may not expect a degree of precision in results which is impossible on account of this very friction. Besides, it can never be learnt theoretically; and if it could, there would still be wanting that experience of judgment which is called tact, and which is always more necessary in a field full of innumerable small and diversified objects, than in great and decisive cases, when one's own judgment may be aided by consultation with others. Just as the man of the world, through tact of judgment which has become habit, speaks, acts, and moves only as suits the occasion, so the officer, experienced in war, will always, in great and small matters, at every pulsation of war as we may say, decide and determine suitably to the occasion. Through this experience and practice, the idea comes to his mind of itself, that so and so will not suit. And thus he will not easily place himself in a position by which he is compromised, which, if it often occurs in war, shakes all the foundations of confidence, and becomes extremely dangerous.

It is, therefore, this friction, or what is so termed here, which makes that which appears easy in war difficult in reality. As we proceed, we shall often meet with this subject again, and it will hereafter become plain that, besides experience and a strong will, there are still many other rare qualities of the mind required to make a man a consummate general.
#9809
speaking of Prussians, the former CO of the Polish army has declared that Kaliningrad "historically belongs to Poland". By which I guess he means Königsberg was briefly & nominally under the throne of Poland two and a half centuries before Clausewitz was born lmao. He also said that the city has been "Russian occupied" "since 1945" lololololol
#9810

cars posted:

speaking of Prussians, the former CO of the Polish army has declared that Kaliningrad "historically belongs to Poland". By which I guess he means Königsberg was briefly & nominally under the throne of Poland two and a half centuries before Clausewitz was born lmao. He also said that the city has been "Russian occupied" "since 1945" lololololol



uh hello it's obviously part of Greater Poland

#9811
teaching so far has taught me 4 things:

1. never underestimate how stupid a human child is
2. never underestimate how much potential a human child has
3. put the needs of the collective above the needs of the individual
4. the system is cruel and fucked!
#9812
four points is a lie, here's some other BS i have learned that contradicts a lot of stuff - controversial crap itt

1. As a teacher the power you wield is horrifying, like night-terror tier shit. never forget
2. You're their teacher, fucking own it. Stand at the front of the class with your wheelbarrows full of degrees and A*s and just own that shit.
3. if you tell them to research some shit they will - overwhelming power.
4. your not a clown, nor a preforming artist, you're a teacher. you are not their to entertain them nor do you have any obligation to do so.
5. school is fucking hard work because learning is hard work. you can't bypass this by making your lessons "fun" and "engaging" (though you can make lessons fun and engaging) so you have to teach them that hard work is valued (socially), worthwhile (for them) and appreciated (by you).
6. covid has done a fuck on them, all the more important to teach the ability to sit still, pay attention, concentrate, and apply themselves - and that's before the think hard bit. children deserve to be taught these basic human skills. its not ridiculous to tell a child to stop swinging on their chair, face the front and pick up their damn pen and start writing; because if you don't do it who else is going to?
7. group work is bullshit unless it is backed up with some sort of carrot+stick combo
8. its ok to teach from the front and bark out basic recall rapid-fire questions like "X, what is the unit of current" to twelve year olds.
9. if they get pen ink all over their hands then no they cannot leave the class to wash it off, just stop chewing your pen!
10. Have confidence, repetition is the key to learning, that that includes them learning about how you will teach. you get push-back the first time you do something in a certain way and its easy to lose confidence. nothing feels worse than setting some work and seeing students take 10 minutes to even start work. but understand that they wont be on board the first time, but do it again and wow... they learn.
11. silent work best work
12. give them time. dont rush. set time limits but make them generous - better an extension question/task than not enough time.
13. it is possible to be super enthusiastic about teaching your subject and making it interesting but still be strict, demanding and require a lot of independent silent work
14. tell them constantly about how hard they should be working.
15. praise them as a group, give group rewards, while also singling out exceptional achievement. treat the class as a unit.
16. most children expect to be punished when they do something wrong - even its its just 5 mins off break sat with you - and not doing so can fuck them up.
17. dont be afraid to use collective punishment if you have to - its horrible, but so is trying to teach when a significant proportion of the class is fucked. better to do the MAD approach a few times than try to carry on as is.
18. teaching is the best damn job in the world

i was thinking its a cruel to be kind thing bit its not, its just a high expectations to do what is right by them. makarenko be my guide.

Edited by tears ()

#9813
finally: if anyone tells you the issue is that your lessons are not engaging enough, tell them to FUCK OFF. prioritize in this order: eliminating disruption, on task behavior, engagement, "excitement".

trust me

#9814
been having some drama and excitement at work lately, i won't go into details but i've progressed through feeling shitty about being aggrieved & am now well into "what are you going to do, fire me" attitude. i've done an end run around the need to unionize my workplace by default; having failed to resign while it was popular, i am now ungovernable because i am literally irreplaceable on a timeframe of less than one year. currently trying to figure how to wield this power for good.. im afraid this might actually just be a mutually assured destruction situation though
#9815
my advice is to resign even if it's not a popular thing to do. find another job, give this one your two weeks, and then offer to do some contract work for them on the side to help cover the "irreplaceable" issue. charge them 20-50% over the standard contract rate. laugh openly in their faces: a rich, diaphragmatic movie-villain laugh, drowning out their initial responses
#9816
i don't think that's really an option for local-level public sector workers. they could prob get some emergency scabs from other nearby towns if they really had to but there'd probably hell and fines to pay. i could be liable for civil penalties and fines as well if i act in obvious bad faith.
i appreciate the sentiment though :)
#9817
is sabotage an option for local-level public sector workers
#9818
the boss is already following the cia manual
#9819

zhaoyao posted:

i don't think that's really an option for local-level public sector workers. they could prob get some emergency scabs from other nearby towns if they really had to but there'd probably hell and fines to pay. i could be liable for civil penalties and fines as well if i act in obvious bad faith.
i appreciate the sentiment though :)



Do the minimum possible and live your life fully until they somehow resolve the situation.

#9820
idk if i posted about it back when it happened but im in IBEW Local 666
#9821
Got laid off from my fake easy job where I smoked weed all day and they gave me a big severance. Now to find another fake easy job where I smoke weed all day and also get vision/dental.
#9822

JohnBeige posted:

idk if i posted about it back when it happened but im in IBEW Local 666



only been working for them since December but ive already torn a muscle in my rotator cuff :P month and a half off on temp medical leave, ooof

#9823
my insurance company started paying ungodly amounts of long term disability. i can even cover my rent now, sweet. almost makes up for the cancer
#9824

zhaoyao posted:

i don't think that's really an option for local-level public sector workers. they could prob get some emergency scabs from other nearby towns if they really had to but there'd probably hell and fines to pay. i could be liable for civil penalties and fines as well if i act in obvious bad faith.
i appreciate the sentiment though :)


https://www.yahoo.com/video/maine-town-effectively-shuttered-sole-233645051.html

Entire Maine town effectively shuttered after sole clerk quits

A small town in Maine has been paralysed after its only clerk quit following the board of selectmen’s decision to deny her vacation request.

Christen Bouchard, town clerk in Passadumkeag, Maine since 2020, submitted a request roughly a month and a half ago to take two weeks off. The board of selectmen declined her request, claiming that there was no one available to fill in for her.

Now since her departure on 7 April, the town has had no one to register vehicles, maintain vital records, or liase with the state Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

Town clerk isn’t the only significant vacancy at the city of Passadumkeag. According to The Bangor Daily News, the town of 356 people also lacks a code enforcement officer, an assessor, an animal control officer, a school administration offical.

On 19 April, a message from the town noted that town office would be closed to in-person visitors until further notice.

“The Treasurer will be in a couple days a week to accept payments on things such as taxes,” the statement read. “Please call the office before heading out to do any business here as there are no designated hours of operation now.”

Treasurer Barbara Boyer has reportedly been coming into the office to collect tax payments, but she is unable to register vehicles, perform building inspections, perform animal welfare checks, or do many of the other things that the town relied on Ms Bouchard for.

An Independent call to the town office went unanswered on Wednesday.

It is not clear that the town will be able to fill the positions and re-open for business any time soon. In March, town residents rejected a budget article meant to fund town operations after town officials failed to adequately explain the reasoning for a proposed salary increase. The budget article also did not include funding for a code enforcement officer, a necessity under Maine law.

Given the budget uncertainty, the town’s small population, and the fact that the muncipal positions are only part-time, town officals told the Bangor Daily News that they are struggling to fill the open positions. Ms Bouchard was only contracted to work 16 hours each week — though she said she often worked more — and was paid just $13,500 per year.


#9825
o i guess there really is no bottom to this pit . well looks like i chose the wrong society to be born into as an altruistic rube
#9826
Sister's friend got diagnosed with gastroparesis. Seems like more people are joining the club these days. She's a vegetarian, but she's going to have to give that up until she gets a neuro-stimulator. She was also skinny, but now she looks like a holocaust victim.
#9827
yeah it's getting more recognized as a post-covid effect. Don't know if that's the case here but regardless all the best to your family
#9828
i've taken up calisthetics - because as i steadily approach the day of my death i realise i really want to be able to do a hand stand
#9829
calisthenics update - exercise is hard when you dont eat. i hate that it makes me hungry. but i like the way it makes me feel good
#9830
suddenly remembered the drummer for my old band praising his cat by calling him “muqtada al-sadr” and “the beating arm for Hezbollah and Hamas in Iraq”
#9831
i survived the year

teaching is hell, i recommend it
#9832
ive rode this bike thousands of miles without incident until the last four weeks where ive gotten my shit fucked up three times. i might be done riding for the season looks like. all in one piece though i cain't complain really, bound to happen some day